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1968 GT6 - Rear Hub Removal Question

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ArcticOne Avatar
ArcticOne John Bulmer
Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Hi everyone. Hoping the year is treating everyone well.

I have a silly simple question.

I am in the process of replacing the rear bearings on my 1968 GT6. I have the churchill tool (thanks to Nigel at SpitBits) and all set up ready to go. I am trying to keep the axle in the car whilst I do this. My issue is that as I tighten the top nut on the tool the axle rotates.

Question: How do I prevent the axle from rotating while tightening the nut on the churchhill tool? Is it as simple as using a large pipe wrench to lock the axle in place?

Comments and thoughts welcome. Good answers greatly appreciated.

cheers

john



John B
Alberta, Canada

DON'T DREAM IT .... BE IT!

In the Igloo:

1968 Triumph GT6 MK I
1968 Triumph GT6 MK I (FE O2)
1988 SaaB 900S

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trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Never tried it that way, but put a large screwdriver behind the hub and let it catch on the flange of the studs and hit the floor.
Interesting and let us know how that turn out.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

ExPatBrit Avatar
ExPatBrit Mike W
Redmond, WA, USA   USA
Opposite side wheel on the ground and the transmission in gear?

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65or66 Gold Member Jim B
Lake village, IN, USA   USA
1965 Triumph Spitfire MkII
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Jusanudda Munny Pit"
Wondering, would it be possible to use that tool with the brake drum in place, and lock it down with the parking brake? Lugs might be too short. I think the original tool had four flats milled on the smaller round section so a big wrench could be used to stop it from turning.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
First off, exactly what issue are you trying to address?

If there is noise/roughness, then the axle itself is likely damaged and will have to be replaced,
so not much gained by 'doing it place'.
Also, you must take pains to work clean, clean, clean.
Any dirt/grime/contamination will lead to early bearing failure.
Suggest that you remove at least the shoes now, as grease contamination will ruin them,
and you must remove the backing plates to service the bearings anyway.

A pipe wrench on the axle will gouge and leave marks, damage that can lead to stress cracks
and axle failure in service, which will spoil your day.

mkivmarty Avatar
mkivmarty Marty Yanik
N.E.Ohio, USA   USA
The hub puller I have is almost identical to the one you picture. I use a BIG (24"winking smiley pipe wrench on the puller it self and a smaller, 18" pipe wrench on the bolt. As others have said, remove the brake drum. Loosen, but do not remove the nut that holds the hub to the axle. Leave a few threads engaged. If and when the hub breaks free the nut will keep it from flying across the room. And expect a VERY loud bang when it does!!

Marty

quikrx Ralph Hansen
Antioch, Illinois, USA   USA
1962 Triumph Herald 1200
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Gloria"
1987 Mazda RX-7 "Mistress"
2003 Toyota Celica GT-S "Natasha"    & more
agree with Jim, the OE tool had flats on the sides to grab - also agree with Carter, nicks/gouges on anything can cause stress cracks over time

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ArcticOne Avatar
ArcticOne John Bulmer
Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Thanks for the comments everyone.

I do have more disassembly before getting to the hard stuff. Good feedback for me and I too have seen the original tools with the flats on them to aid in locking it in place.

Intent is to get the hub off to check and see if failed bearings have damaged axle. They likely have, but want to approach the problem this way first (at least for this side).

Plus I get to buy another tool - ginormous pipe wrench time. WHOOO HOOOO

john



John B
Alberta, Canada

DON'T DREAM IT .... BE IT!

In the Igloo:

1968 Triumph GT6 MK I
1968 Triumph GT6 MK I (FE O2)
1988 SaaB 900S

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1477382 by ArcticOne Thanks for the comments everyone.

I do have more disassembly before getting to the hard stuff. Good feedback for me and I too have seen the original tools with the flats on them to aid in locking it in place.

Intent is to get the hub off to check and see if failed bearings have damaged axle. They likely have, but want to approach the problem this way first (at least for this side).

Plus I get to buy another tool - ginormous pipe wrench time. WHOOO HOOOO

john

Much easier and straightforward to jam a large screwdriver or prybar blade into the U Joint, kind of what Wayne suggested.
The flange and axle mate with machined tapered surfaces, like a Morse Taper, not a straight press fit.
Often, straight pressure alone, even from a multi-ton hydraulic press is unable to break the taper joint loose.
The original Churchill tool was designed so that the center bolt would be tightened to apply force to the axle, and then shock
from hammer blows onto the center screw would break the taper joint to free the flange.

Some folks have had success with an impact wrench, as it both tightens the screw and supplies shock blows.

You may also have success by tightening the screw the screw, and then placing a sturdy drift against the shank of the
flange from the side, and smartly striking it with a hammer.
This not only applies shock to the joint, but will temporarily distort the flange taper, which unseats it from the shaft taper.
Once the joint seal breaks loose in one spot, it will spread to the rest of the joint because of the screw pressure.

As said, uncrew the axle nut by 2-3 turns, to keep things from flying apart when the taper joint breaks open.

I've done this job many times over the past 50 or so years.

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ArcticOne Avatar
ArcticOne John Bulmer
Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Hi guys - and thanks. IT WORKED!!

I am thrilled. I am not that mechanically inclined and was surprised at how relatively easy the hub came off.

I did jam a pry bar in to u-joint, but it kept slipping out. So I took my new friend (24 inch pipe wrench) and then clamped it to sides of hub. After that it was tightening it down and then as Carter suggested, a couple of good whacks on the churchhill tool top nut.

The hub removed by hand after that. Now I get to remove the rest of that stuff in there and see if I damaged the axle when the bearing blew apart. Fingers are crossed, although in my heart of hearts I know that I will be contributing further to Nigel's retirement fund as I order a new half shaft or two.

Some pics since I know that is the only reason why menfolk buy in to these adult type magazines.

Cheers and progress advances.

john



John B
Alberta, Canada

DON'T DREAM IT .... BE IT!

In the Igloo:

1968 Triumph GT6 MK I
1968 Triumph GT6 MK I (FE O2)
1988 SaaB 900S


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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
I pulled the whole axle when I did mine and clamped it in a vice before pulling the hub.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
Glad to hear it worked out.
Sometimes they are easy, sometimes not.

ArcticOne Avatar
ArcticOne John Bulmer
Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Trying not to get too cocky. This was the offside. Still have the nearside to do!!

And I still have to remove the other fiddly bits to check on the axle condition.



John B
Alberta, Canada

DON'T DREAM IT .... BE IT!

In the Igloo:

1968 Triumph GT6 MK I
1968 Triumph GT6 MK I (FE O2)
1988 SaaB 900S

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

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