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spitfire oil cooler

Moss Motors
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claytoncnc Avatar
claytoncnc Gold Member Marcus Clayton
Melbourne, Ivanhoe, Australia   AUS
The motor was bought new in 2009 as a GM industrial crate motor. It was set to run on propane, and powered a 5ML per day artesian bore in South Western NSW.
This required about 50KW continuous at about 2200rpm.
The motor was cooled by a liquid/liquid heat exchanger in the pipe from the bore to the water channel.
It came to my workshop a week later in the state you see.

There was localised overheating evident on all the exhaust valves, leading to distortion of the seats, leakage past the valves and to the damage seen. It was determined that there was nucleate boiling at these hot spots, causing steam to be trapped in a pocket area above the exhaust valves, and a vapour lock, that reduced flow through the heads to almost nil.

Bleeds were introduced above the exhaust ports, so any steam could escape, back to a swirl pot to de-aerate the coolant before being fed back to the coolant pump.
A high flow pump was fitted with a large bypass, also feeding to the swirl pot so that the mass of coolant could circulate around the motor quickly, the thermostat only opening when the coolant mass required (not just a hot spot).
A Water Oil heat exchanger was added at the same time.

After new valves and inserts were fitted, the motor was rebuilt , the crank ground and a different ring stack was used, and the engine put back into service. It then was reliable, but used about 20% more fuel than a purpose built engine, due mainly to lack of a turbocharger, however it is less than half the price of a purpose built motor.

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Funny, from my (very limited) experience I was wondering if it was running on propane.

Seems a funny choice for a prime mover though.

I once had the job of minding a pump powered by a Kubota Diesel, on a barge, moored offshore.
I had the graveyard shift during a couple of winter months. I never had to do a thing. that engine ran continuously for three years, NEVER stopping.

claytoncnc Avatar
claytoncnc Gold Member Marcus Clayton
Melbourne, Ivanhoe, Australia   AUS
Propane was used because of the fuel price as compared to diesel.

One farmer using Bennett Clayton pump engines on his rice farm was saving $30K a month in fuel bills, with perfect reliability.

The photos are of one of my Bennett Clayton pumps, running at around 90KW, and pumping 10ML per day, taken at a field day in 2009.
This motor now has over 35000 hours on it, and has just come in for a top end rebuild.

It has run non stop for about 8 months of the year for 7 years, with only routine maintenance.

The reason we got the 454 in was the farmer on the next door property wanted those savings as well, but decided to do it himself with the Chev engine.
When it stopped, and we were asked to make it fit for purpose, the eventual cost was not far short of buying one of our engines in the first instance

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Very interesting Marcus, I will read more tomorrow.

I was working for Sykes back in the 70's.

colodad Avatar
colodad Silver Member Calvin Williams
Grand Junction, Colorado, USA   USA
interesting pictures.

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