TRExp

Spitfire & GT6 Forum

spitfire oil cooler

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

spitfire oil cooler
#1
  This topic is about my 1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500
bonnett1954 Avatar
bonnett1954 Silver Member Dave Bonnett
Las Vegas, NEVADA, USA   USA
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Union Jack"
Any thoughts on installing an oil cooler on a 1500 spitfire. The only place that i can see to install one is directly in front of the radiator between the frame rails.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
sparrowpi Avatar
sparrowpi Silver Member David Sherrow
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA   USA
Maintaining good oil health is never a bad idea and overheated oil is not good. If you use your LBC like most of us an oil cooler might be more trouble than it's worth. In front of the rad is about the only place it would work.

tmpass Avatar
tmpass Tim P
Medway, MA, USA   USA
1970 Triumph GT6+ (MkII) "Capo"
1970 Triumph GT6+ (MkII) "Blue Oxide"
In reply to # 1328091 by sparrowpi Maintaining good oil health is never a bad idea and overheated oil is not good. If you use your LBC like most of us an oil cooler might be more trouble than it's worth. In front of the rad is about the only place it would work.

Agreed, for harsh driving, auto cross/racing do it. Everyday driver? Not worth the expense or trouble.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
bonnett1954 Avatar
bonnett1954 Silver Member Dave Bonnett
Las Vegas, NEVADA, USA   USA
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Union Jack"
Thanks for the advice, I assume LBC stands for Little British Classic?

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
An oil cooler exposes the very lifeblood of your engine to the harsh environment of the world; stones, sticks, debris, etc.
Would you have surgery to expose your Aorta on your chest, where damage to it could lead to bleeding to death in a few seconds?
Not just the cooler itself, but also the hoses are at risk.

Between the frame rails ahead of the radiator is a good location, you can mount coarse steel mesh (chicken wire) ahead of it to protect from debris.
Either use braided hoses, or wrap the 'standard' rubber hoses to protect them.

Yes, radiator is also exposed, but there's a much longer interval before engine damage, and radiator gives a distinct olfactory indication.

If you live in colder climes, may have to block it off with cardboard, can prevent the motor from reaching operating temperature.

sparrowpi Avatar
sparrowpi Silver Member David Sherrow
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA   USA
In reply to # 1328094 by bonnett1954 Thanks for the advice, I assume LBC stands for Little British Classic?

It could be classic since they are but usually it's car.

grumpicus Steve Jackson
Leicester, Leicestershire, UK   GBR
If you do fit one, make sure it's one with a thermostat in the adaptor plate. Running with an oil cooler and no thermostat means the oil may never get up to temperature in cold weather.

I'm currently working on a scheme to fit a VW Golf (VW Rabbit in the US?) alloy radiator to a Mk4 Spit - the new radiator is mounted about 1.5" further forward, so there may be room to fit the oil cooler behind the radiator - if there's room for the coolant return pipe as well......



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-11-08 04:28 PM by grumpicus.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
bonnett1954 Avatar
bonnett1954 Silver Member Dave Bonnett
Las Vegas, NEVADA, USA   USA
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Union Jack"
Thanks for the advice, although cold weather not a problem out here in the Nevada desert, Cheers.

Lizzard d id
san jose, ca, USA   USA
You can turn your oil pan into a cooler oil pan . Put fins on it to help remove heat from the oil .
It will not do as good a job as a good oil cooler but it will be better than nothing .

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1328118 by grumpicus If you do fit one, make sure it's one with a thermostat in the adaptor plate. Running with an oil cooler and no thermostat means the oil may never get up to temperature in cold weather.

I'm currently working on a scheme to fit a VW Golf (VW Rabbit in the US?) alloy radiator to a Mk4 Spit - the new radiator is mounted about 1.5" further forward, so there may be room to fit the oil cooler behind the radiator - if there's room for the coolant return pipe as well......

VW also makes a nice compact little pancake oil/water heat exchanger that can be easily integrated with oil filter.

Helps by warming the oil when it's too cold, cooling the oil when it's too hot.

http://www.1aauto.com/1998-00-vw-beetle-engine-oil-cooler-for-l4-2.0l/i/1aeoc00127?f=700470?utm_source=MSN_AdCenter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=BingShopping&utm_content=EOC

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
Carter,
I have seen similar heat exchangers. One thing that has stopped me is finding the center bolt to attach it to the Spitfire block. I suppose I could have a machinist friend make one for me.
Then again a temp sender bung in the oil pan to learn where I am starting from might be wiser.
All the best,
Paul

grumpicus Steve Jackson
Leicester, Leicestershire, UK   GBR
I guess you would need the same bolt as the one used to fit an adaptor plate to a Spit block when using an external oil cooler. I'm pretty sure Moss in the UK stock them (part no. TT9401 - Adaptor Bolt 3/4" ) - maybe the US branch also stocks them?

The VW type cooler is an excellent idea - my wife had a 1989 MG Metro which had an almost identical oil cooler as standard from the factory. It must have worked well - nothing overheated, oil pressure was never a problem, and it did over 120,000 miles on the original pistons & rings. If I hadn't already got the 13 row oil cooler, I might well have opted for the VW type cooler myself!



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2015-11-09 05:14 AM by grumpicus.

hearditallbefore Avatar
Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK   GBR
I'm looking into one of those oil/water oil coolers for the Vitesse.
Seems to be the best of both worlds - very compact and can't over-cool the oil.



Swatting the yellow jackets away from the Triumph apple of truth…

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
I wonder if one of the center 'studs' from a regular sandwich adaptor would fit?.
(sorry, I didn't see Steve's post above)
I'd like to see what the stock VW 'stud' looks like.
Could run the water hose from the pump across the front of the motor to the exchanger, then from there to the rear of the block and across to the heater connections.
Maybe use steel tubes bent to fit closely instead of long runs of hoses?



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2015-11-09 01:53 PM by clshore.

hearditallbefore Avatar
Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK   GBR
In reply to # 1328250 by clshore I wonder if one of the center 'studs' from a regular sandwich adaptor would fit?.
I'd like to see what the stock VW 'stud' looks like.
Could run the water hose from the pump across the front of the motor to the exchanger, then from there to the rear of the block and across to the heater connections.
Maybe use steel tubes bent to fit closely instead of long runs of hoses?



I'm thinking the same, the bypass pipe from the water pump to the heater runs in pipe work on the six and could be tapped in.


FWIW, way back in the day, Triumph used to list an oil cooler as a factory fit option for 'continental motoring' Freeways were a new thing in England and not many miles of them unlike the continent. Sustained high speed running really taxes any of the older 50's British engines, they just weren't expected to put in much sustained high speed running and when the first freeways opened in England, cars died in their thousands with run bearings.



Swatting the yellow jackets away from the Triumph apple of truth…

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster