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Recruiting Young Members

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lgray001 Avatar
lgray001 Gold Member Larry Gray
Lexington, VA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR7 "POS-2"
1979 Triumph TR7 "The Money Pit"
All:

This weekend I was elected Membership Chairman of the Shenandoah Valley British Car Club.

One of the things I want to make an effort to achieve is recruiting young members as most of our members are 50+.

I would appreciate any suggestions from the forum membership.

Thanks,

Larry Gray

ALL:

I've received 65 responses in one day from the various forums.

Thanks for your input.

Larry



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-07 04:29 PM by lgray001.


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jplatel1 jacob P
Albany, NY, USA   USA
Im 26, and have wanted to buy a triumph since i was a kid because of exposure to a family friends TR3, I am definitely a bit of an oddball, but may have a couple ideas,

Although i haven't had much time to think about it, I think the best way to expose younger people to British cars is to try to engage with more modern car clubs. it is important to note that people my age are definitely interested in cars, but many have no experience with 50s and 60s European cars. Maybe associating with and setting up collaborative events with more modern Japanese or american car clubs will expose the cars were interested in to more people 18-45. all it takes is one good experience to get someone hooked!

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Have you considered doing a Show and Tell at a local school? Many young people do not know or understand that a car can be taken apart and put back together, cars are seen as disposable appliances that are sent to a dealer to be mysteriously fixed or just discarded if they are old because repair is not ecconomic.

I remeber having a neighbours teen age kid help me bleed brakes, he stuck around and helped me a few times. One day (I think I was removing a starter) the youg guy said, with some supprise "it's just nuts and bolts!"

I think a light came on in his head, that there was nothing magic or mysterious about cars (or at least old cars) they can come apart with simple tools and the logic of their parts and function becomes apparent .



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-06 10:39 PM by Tonyfixit.

ducbsa Bruce Metcalf
Berryville, Virginia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496339 by jplatel1 Im 26, and have wanted to buy a triumph since i was a kid because of exposure to a family friends TR3, I am definitely a bit of an oddball, but may have a couple ideas,

Although i haven't had much time to think about it, I think the best way to expose younger people to British cars is to try to engage with more modern car clubs. it is important to note that people my age are definitely interested in cars, but many have no experience with 50s and 60s European cars. Maybe associating with and setting up collaborative events with more modern Japanese or american car clubs will expose the cars were interested in to more people 18-45. all it takes is one good experience to get someone hooked!

That is a good idea, I'll pass it along.

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tomster Avatar
tomster Tom Dunbar
Annapolis, Maryland, USA   USA
I think taking kids to the car shows is very influencing. I've taken some of my kids and they will be future Triumph owners I think.
Of course that's not an easy thing to do, but also I imagine we all need to drive our vehicles as much as we can to get them
out in the public eye.

Good luck!

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
I think one thing that may help is to let young people drive. We spend so much time polishing and making things perfect we are reluctant to throw someone the keys. These are Sports Cars after all. They were designed for the sport of driving. I was in CA a couple years ago and while having dinner at a pub, I asked around whose Powder Blue TR4 and whose Red TR250 were parked outside. Two gentlemen at the bar threw me the keys!

A modern car just doesn't have the look and feel of a British Sports car. I would guess that a 20 something might be quite pleased to drive around in a TR4 or an MG, who wouldn't? Seeing a car at a car show is Okay but kind of boring really. Taking someone for a drive is pretty good, but letting them drive is the magic.

I have thrown the keys to a lot of people and yes I'm nervous, but they always come back in about 30 minutes with a big smile!

There are a lot of young people participating in Rally competition over in Europe. Why aren't Rally events more common in the States?

That might be a way to introduce young people. You Co-pilot and click off checkpoints, while they drive.


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brickwhite Avatar
brickwhite Ted Z
St. Louis, Missouri, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4 "TR-4"
Guys,

I'm 39 not young any more but not old either...

Marcus and Tom have hit the nail on the head... When I go places or take my TR-4 or my old BMWs places and younger people Stop or take interest... The first thing I ask is, "have you sat in one", "ridden in one", "Or driven one"?

I know I have a lot of money tied into them but.... what's the point if I'm the only one that can enjoy it. I let them hop in at least... Drive... sometimes...

Especially if I have my TR-4 at a car show and there are Kids there other than my own.... I have them sit in the seat, grab the steering wheel and honk the horn. They love it... And will probably remember it...

Driving a TR-4 is a lot different than any modern car I've driven....

There lies another issue... most Helicopter parents of today would not let their child buy or drive a car without an "AIR BAG". It's not as if you cannot find a 70s spitfire on Craigslist or FB Marketplace under $2000. But to get a millennial away from there phone or out of their parents protection is another feat.





From a younger Crowd perspective ... Facebook is a great place to add a local Club group and sell parts..


In reply to # 1496389 by tomster I think taking kids to the car shows is very influencing. I've taken some of my kids and they will be future Triumph owners I think.
Of course that's not an easy thing to do, but also I imagine we all need to drive our vehicles as much as we can to get them
out in the public eye.

Good luck!



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-07 01:54 PM by brickwhite.

tomster Avatar
tomster Tom Dunbar
Annapolis, Maryland, USA   USA
Ted you are so right when you say:
In reply to a post by There lies another issue... most Helicopter parents of today would not let their child buy or drive a car without an "AIR BAG". It's not as if you cannot find a 70s spitfire on Craigslist or FB Marketplace under $2000. But to get a millennial away from there phone or out of their parents protection is another feat.

We have gotten to be such wimps as a society. Being cautious is ok but everyone should be able to gauge their own risks.

I'm going to start getting my 17 year old to help me work on my TR4 and after he's read the owners manual he can take it out for a spin.
Hoping to maybe get him to save his lifeguard wages up for a Spit. I think since these cars have less creature comforts and technology
to smooth out or make the driving easier they in fact produce better drivers who have to pay attention to what they are doing.

Ain't nobody gonna be texting while driving a Triumph classic!

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