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Powder Blue Hardtop '62

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Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
Detailed the engine and transmission today. I use a degreaser followed by simple green and a power wash. After that a little wire brushing the nooks and crannies. Then apply three coats of VHT gloss black engine enamel. Polished the fuel pump, oil filter housing, thermostat housing, fan blade. Fixed a stuck overdrive microswitch. That is a critical one to fix because it is the 2nd gear selector and prevents overdrive from engaging in reverse. Cleaned up the overdrive solenoid and tested. Finished the other SU carb. Cleaned up other parts. Ready for reassembly once the car is back from the paint shop.

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Geko Avatar
Geko Stef SG
Kuala Lumpur, WP, Malaysia   MYS
Interesting belt width...I would install the "snorkel" type crankcase breather and consider a spin-on oil filter too

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
I'm pretty sure the belt is correct. Seems the same as belts on every Triumph I've owned. There is a cogged version which does last longer.

I had a '64 TR4 with Strombergs and I found them aggravating at times. The breather system may have satisfied the US regulators but I always had the breather hoses blowing off the air cleaners or off the valve cover and oil vapor staining everything. The passageway was only about 1/2" and no where near big enough. The design seemed hurried and flawed. The lower case vent had been deleted and you just had blow-by pressure. On the older engines you have the mesh oil cap and the big vent below the fuel pump. Never had a problem with this system.

I like the old Purolator oil filter cannister, with its odd green color, and fiddly rubber seal. The spin on filter is way too easy!

My favorite things about TR4s (besides the body shape) are the holdover mechanicals from the WWII era. The analog instruments, gauges, handbrake lever, scuttle vent, dual SU carbs, generator, mechanical voltage regulator, jack the car from your seat, hand crank, leather bucket seats....But then you have the modern conveniences such as wind up windows, disc brakes, sun visors....

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Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
Repainted the Purolator Oil filter canister. Kind of a Government green color. Still need to do more cleaning and refinish those bolt heads! Made repairs to the overdrive wiring, sand blasted and rebuilt the master cylinders. Winding down on sub assemblies to clean and repair. The car should be painted by the end of September and then on to re-assembly. It takes more time to put it together than take it apart. But I have done enough Triumphs that I know a pretty good sequence and tricks. I really enjoy the adjusting and getting things right. It's cleaner work and very satisfying when done.


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ShortBulge Brian LeBlanc
Falls Church, Virginia, USA   USA
Were those canisters all that color?

and ....list all those tricks out !

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
Every TR4 I've owned had that ugly green oil filter. It was also that green color on my '59 TR3a. So that spans '59-'64. It really only matters to someone interested in the original oil filter color. A spin on certainly is easier.

Tips and tricks? Most are buried deep inside this forum. There are so many that come from experience.
Here's a couple:
Always run a 1/4-28 tap into the threads before reassembly, and put a little oil on the bolts so they will last longer. Pre glue the trans tunnel cover gasket and cut out the thru holes. Bolt up the firewall trans cover bolts first. Remove the trans gear cover before removing or re-installing the engine. Loosen all the connector clips on the SU carbs and back off the idle stops to centralize the butterflys before tuning SU's. If the sound dampening has been removed from the timing chain cover, you can apply bondo and pat it with a putty knife until it puffs and roughens up as it dries. then paint black. Lightly sand the felts in the cowl vents to freshen them up. Put a little grease on hose connections. Get your doors on before fenders and make sure they close well. Use heat shrink tubing to clean up spade connectors and wipe the wiring down with lacquer thinner so you can read the wire color code. Freshen up galvanized steel by wire brusing, a mist of cold galvanizing paint and a further mist of silver metallic enamel, then burnish with a soft towel. You can replace or refresh horse hair with a woven air filter material from Home Depot cut to size and spayed with undercoating. Install seats and upholstery last so you don't foul them. Cut an access hole at the rear of the trans tunnel for lubing the UJoints and one near the trans oil fill - seal with a rubber plug. Four old water bottles and some plastic tubing makes bleeding brakes a snap. Install wiper wheelboxes and wiper motor before installing heater, dash engine or anything else that would get in the way, even before wiring harness. Install window felts and scrapers after getting the windows in, undo clips and gently lower window all the way down and out of the way. Pry open the clips slightly before pulling them up onto the felts and scrapers. Always leave bolts and nuts on where they came from if possible or take pictures, put fasteners in zip locks and mark with black felt pen what they are. Make a photo chronology of disassembly steps so you can reverse he prcedure, or have a notepad handy to make exploded view notes. Always retorque head bolts after 500 miles and after 1000 recheck.

ShortBulge Brian LeBlanc
Falls Church, Virginia, USA   USA
...I'M PUTTING THAT ON A POSTER IN GARAGE !

Does that green have a name, 1 of my canisters still had a small fleck of it...

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Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
Two more tips

When you disconnect the oil pressure line from the back of the gauge there is a small cork washer that you need to keep in place or save somewhere carefully. Put a piece of tape on the gauge face that says "check line" . Don't remove the note until you are sure you have secured the line to the gauge. Twice I haven't tightened that pressure line and started the engine after a fresh rebuild. Guess what happens?

And one more speaking of oil and regrets. If you pull the engine and trans, absolutely replace the set screw bolt that holds the cross piece to the throw-out fork. The originals are prone to break and you are screwed! Check the condition of the clutch plate, pressure plate, flywheel face. If there is any blue scorching replace pressure plate and resurface the flywheel. And top up the tranny case with oil to the fill line. It's easier than from below.

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
I received the steering column rebushing kit today from TRF. I was prepared for another hellish experience. Last time I used a Moss set of bushings and it required reaming, a lot of force, more reaming and machining and ended up barely making the repair with little improvement when done. Also managed to damage the column housing during the process. Grrrgh!

So with all this in the back of my mind I cleaned the column really good and coated with light grease. I test fit the bushing to the column and the fit was nice and smooth. So I figured that installing the bushings would still require a press and then they would tighten so much the column wouldn't fit. I used some Vaseline on the bushings and pushed them in with a wood dowel. To my surprise they slid in fairly easy. Then the test - would the column still fit the bushings? Yes! Very smooth precise feeling.

I must say TRF is impressing me every time. I have a feeling they take the time to make sure parts are correct.

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ShortBulge Brian LeBlanc
Falls Church, Virginia, USA   USA
But ordering from them is Torture!

BL50 Avatar
BL50 Silver Member Brian Leslie
Grosse Pointe, Michigan, USA   USA
Actually, I think ordering is pretty easy once you get used to their system - but trying to find the part can be torture! I like TRF because I think they are genuinely concerned about the quality of the parts they sell and they are very approachable. I can call Charles or Albert any time and get a quick answer to my questions. Since my restoration has been, and continues to be, a years-long project I also took advantage of their investor program. I get 8% interest on my money sent every month like clockwork and a 34% discount on most parts.

Brian

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
As I rebuild this car I am impressed with the materials. The parts are 50+ years old and all can be refurbished, cleaned polished or replaced with like new. I was thinking about how this car could easily be around for another 60 years if taken care of. Imagine a Ford Escape or Pontiac G5 in 50 years. So many plastic parts, fragile switches, thin sheet metal. I don't consider much past the muscle cars of the 70's to be classics worth saving. Maybe that's just a bias.
I wonder though if the next generations of young people will have any interest in old British Sports cars. I hope so.

These cars were built for the pure pleasure of driving and racing. At a time when you could run up the speedometer past 100 mph on brand new autobahns and motorways.

malbaby Avatar
malbaby malcolm baker
kyabram, Australia   AUS
Have you considered extra detailing of engine, gearbox etc. with stainless steel bolts/nuts.

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, Michigan, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
I will be replacing some nuts and bolts where needed. The bolts for the trans to engine were cleaned up shiny on a wire wheel and look nice. They weren't rusty just covered in oil and dirt.

malbaby Avatar
malbaby malcolm baker
kyabram, Australia   AUS
IMHO your now shiny bolts will eventually have light surface rust.

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