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Using heat on calipers

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tonytr3 Avatar
tonytr3 Tony M
Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA   USA
I have "type B" calipers on a '59 tr3. No external crossover, internal passages with a seal. Anyone have thoughts, or better yet experience, on using heat to remove broken bleeder? How might it affect the internal seals?

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charleyf Silver Member Charley Fitch
Redding, California, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "MR.T"
Tony,
The only internal seal in the calipers is an O ring bout in the center of the caliper. So I would say that it depends upon how well you can direct the heat. Or maybe find a way to protect that O ring if you have to use a LOT of heat. Alternately you can separate the two halves of the caliper. I have a friend that did it and put them back together and it functioned just fine. He did not even replace the O ring at the time.
Thinking that the caliper is useless the way it is, splitting the caliper isn't to bad of an idea.
Charley

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
Of course there are also the seals on the pistons.

IMO if you're going to use heat, it's best to plan on replacing all the seals. Ditto if you've been using penetrating oil on the stuck bleeder. The seal between the halves doesn't come in the rebuild kit, but is available separately from the usual suspects.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

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Jacad Avatar
Jacad Gold Member Barry Shefner
Montreal, QC, Canada   CAN
1959 Triumph TR3A "Loose Wheels"
1976 Triumph TR6 "The Tweetster"
I would first try using a screw extractor without heat to get the broken part of the bleeder out of the caliper (if you have never used one ) If it refuses to budge then try some heat. Last thing you want to do is damage the threads as you cannot use a thread repair to fix it (It will not seal properly - firsthand experience) and you will need to have the hole welded and then drilled and retapped. (I don't recall the tap size but it's not a popular one)



Barry
59 TR3A 0TS57675LO - "Loose Wheels"
76 TR6 CF54266U - "The Tweetster"
Website: Triumph TR2-TR3-TR4 www.trtriumph.com/ (sorry for not keeping it current for the past couple of years)

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
Are the threads different on the later calipers then? The early bleed screws are just 3/8NF, which is pretty common.

I also can't see any reason a helicoil wouldn't work. The threads don't actually seal at all, the seal is between the tip of the bleed screw and the seat in the caliper. As long as you don't screw up the seat (or recut it afterwards), it should still seal.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

Jacad Avatar
Jacad Gold Member Barry Shefner
Montreal, QC, Canada   CAN
1959 Triumph TR3A "Loose Wheels"
1976 Triumph TR6 "The Tweetster"
Randall,

I believe that the bleed screws are 3/8" BSF 20tpi https://www.ebay.com/itm/2x-3-8-BSF-20tpi-Brake-Bleed-Screw-Valves-for-Triumph-TR2-TR3-1953-57-Lockheed/332254726518 That is the helicoil size that I ordered when I had stripped threads on one of my calipers. I don't recall the exact reason but after installing the helicoil the bleed valve would not seal correctly and kept on leaking.



Barry
59 TR3A 0TS57675LO - "Loose Wheels"
76 TR6 CF54266U - "The Tweetster"
Website: Triumph TR2-TR3-TR4 www.trtriumph.com/ (sorry for not keeping it current for the past couple of years)

retiredtr Avatar
retiredtr dan acri
wellsville, pennsylvania, USA   USA
Tony, before you apply heat there is a tool that is available. It utilizes compressed air and an impact tool. You install a rod into the bleeder and allow 1/4 inch of the rod to protrude from the bleeder.

The air tool impacts the rod and it will loosen the bleeder to use an easy out to remove it.

I have used this method many times.


Dan

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tonytr3 Avatar
tonytr3 Tony M
Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA   USA
Thank you all for the information and thoughts. Looks like I have some decisions to make.

tony

wyatt Avatar
wyatt Silver Member Wyatt W
penguin point, drift ice, Antarctica   ATA
I have used heat with a brazing tip, cherry red AROUND the bleeder, then douse with water intill it quits sizziling,it will open up, do not try to remove while hot...it will shear...

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TR3barton Avatar
TR3barton John Taylor
Greenfield, MA, USA   USA
Listers,

All the above ideas may work but if not there are repair kits for the hole. They cost circa $6. and consist of a socket and a bleed screw.

You will need to drill out the hole with good precision and then tap a thread to match the new seat/socket. The new part will be brass.
This should end the issue.

tonytr3 Avatar
tonytr3 Tony M
Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA   USA
Can you supply a name and source for the part you describe?

Thanks,

tony

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