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Knob lettering

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Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Silver Member Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, USA   USA
For some reason, probably age, I do not feel like working in the garage this winter with kerosene heaters. And since the rainy cooler November temperatures have hit Western PA I moved to small stuff in the basement. I have started on the dash gauges and I am about half way through. Vinyl repairs and dyeing, wire harness refurbishment, and light fixture repairs.

All my dash switches have been refurbished and the knobs are in great shape except for the lettering. I tried using white out and then buffing off the excess on my buffer. It helped but not great. has anyone done this and can offer some suggestions? I know you can buy new knobs fairly reasonable but money saved in one place buys parts for another.



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

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tapkaJohnD Avatar
tapkaJohnD John Davies
Lancaster, Lancashire, UK   GBR
"White out", Pat? What's that? Stuff for correcting typescript? It's a bit soft and gets dirty.

I've used white gloss paint on my timing pulley. Baked gently ina warming cupboard to let it get hard, then cut off the over layer with a sharp knife.

John


Attachments:
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DSCF0813.JPG

Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
Years ago I did something like this on my TR3 knobs with a product designed to paint the raised letters on tires white. I bought it at a FLAPS, and it seemed to be a common product back in the early '80s . It worked really well applied as you described, and quite durable. Not sure anyone paints tire letters anymore. I'm searching for a solution to repair the lettering on a pair of MGB heat/vent controls.

Doug



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-31 11:53 AM by Fictioneer.

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ArtL Avatar
ArtL Art Liefke
Kings Park, New York, USA   USA
I used white acrylic paint. Like artist acrylic that you can get at Michael's, etc. I cleaned the knobs first with soap and water. I then smeared the acrylic into the letters and lightly wiped the excess away. The acrylic can be thinned with water. You may have to mess around to get the right mixture, as straight out of the tube is usually too thick.



Art


Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. - Benjamin Franklin


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Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Silver Member Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, USA   USA
This is probably something I used to paint white walls on my Hudson quite a few years ago. I found a number of paints online at that time and a search may turn up some.

In reply to # 1495160 by Fictioneer Years ago I did something like this on my TR3 knobs with a product designed to paint the raised letters on tires white. I bought it at a FLAPS, and it seemed to be a common product back in the early '80s . It worked really well applied as you described, and quite durable. Not sure anyone paints tire letters anymore. I'm searching for a solution to repair the lettering on a pair of MGB heat/vent controls.

Doug



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Silver Member Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, USA   USA
I was trying to stay away from a wet product as I had tried something in the past that required a depressed area in white and I kept wiping it off. i will give this another try and see it I can make it work. Thanks for the tip.
In reply to # 1495167 by ArtL I used white acrylic paint. Like artist acrylic that you can get at Michael's, etc. I cleaned the knobs first with soap and water. I then smeared the acrylic into the letters and lightly wiped the excess away. The acrylic can be thinned with water. You may have to mess around to get the right mixture, as straight out of the tube is usually too thick.



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Silver Member Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, USA   USA
I purposely used a soft lacquer based product so I could buff it off with out damaging the knob. I would be afraid to scrape a knife across the type of material on the knobs.

In reply to # 1495159 by tapkaJohnD "White out", Pat? What's that? Stuff for correcting typescript? It's a bit soft and gets dirty.

I've used white gloss paint on my timing pulley. Baked gently ina warming cupboard to let it get hard, then cut off the over layer with a sharp knife.

John



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

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6TTR3A Frank Conklin
San Diego,CA, USA   USA
Here's my formula. A bit busy but almost everlasting.
Wash in hot water/detergent, removing all grease and as much of the old lettering
paint as possible. Lacquer thinner goes faster if you don't mind using it.
Krylon™ rattle can Gloss White enamel (product # RTA 9200) but don"t spray.
Fill a small container (bottle cap) then, using an artists brush, dab the paint
in the letter depressions. Do several coats until it is well built up. Let it dry for
several days. Remove the excess first with wet or dry 600 grit, when you have
removed 90% of the overlay paint, finish it off with wet/dry 2000 grit. Do this
on a soft surface. I use several layers of paper towels and lots of water.
Don't get too aggressive or you will start to remove the lettering altogether,
especially at the ends. (ie, the C and E in CHOKE) The 2000 grit will result in a
matte finish which looks OK but if you want a gloss finish, spray the top surface
with clear lacquer. If you go the clear lacquer route, go very slow, those knobs
invite "orange peel". An alternate is a coat of pure carnuba wax.
Frank

Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Silver Member Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, Pennsylvania, USA   USA
Thanks Frank. I did used your method partially on my heater knob and the results were fair. The knob looks better than the picture. I may try it again and coat with a gloss clear instead of matte clear.



In reply to # 1495543 by 6TTR3A Here's my formula. A bit busy but almost everlasting.
Wash in hot water/detergent, removing all grease and as much of the old lettering
paint as possible. Lacquer thinner goes faster if you don't mind using it.
Krylon™ rattle can Gloss White enamel (product # RTA 9200) but don"t spray.
Fill a small container (bottle cap) then, using an artists brush, dab the paint
in the letter depressions. Do several coats until it is well built up. Let it dry for
several days. Remove the excess first with wet or dry 600 grit, when you have
removed 90% of the overlay paint, finish it off with wet/dry 2000 grit. Do this
on a soft surface. I use several layers of paper towels and lots of water.
Don't get too aggressive or you will start to remove the lettering altogether,
especially at the ends. (ie, the C and E in CHOKE) The 2000 grit will result in a
matte finish which looks OK but if you want a gloss finish, spray the top surface
with clear lacquer. If you go the clear lacquer route, go very slow, those knobs
invite "orange peel". An alternate is a coat of pure carnuba wax.
Frank



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-05 07:20 AM by Pat.L.

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Jacad Avatar
Jacad Gold Member Barry Shefner
Montreal, QC, Canada   CAN
1959 Triumph TR3A "Loose Wheels"
1976 Triumph TR6 "The Tweetster"
Doug/Patrick

Perhaps this Tire paint is what you are looking for https://www.rangerpaint.com/ I just ordered some to redo my whitewalls



Barry
59 TR3A 0TS57675LO - "Loose Wheels"
76 TR6 CF54266U - "The Tweetster"
Website: Triumph TR2-TR3-TR4 www.trtriumph.com/ (sorry for not keeping it current for the past couple of years)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-05 10:48 AM by Jacad.

Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
Barry, that looks a lot like what I used. Mine came in a little jar with a built-in brush.
Doug



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

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