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TR3 Trickle Charger Connection

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TR3 Trickle Charger Connection
#1
  This topic is about my 1957 Triumph TR3
pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
I would like to connect a trickle charger to my 1957 TR3.

I prefer not leaving the bonnet open while the charger is connected. I was hoping another member might have suggestions how I could install a cable from the battery to a point outside the engine bay where I could connect and disconnect the charger. I had thought about a cable connection point around the grill area.

Can anyone offer me any suggestions?

Bob

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR3B
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
On my spitfire i have permanently attached a battery cut off on the positive post, one that you turn the knob to connect and disconnect. On the battery side of things i have permanently connected the wires to my battery maintainer. Those wires have about a twelve inch run to a female plug.

When storing the car i plug in the male end from the maintainer, and route the wire to the corner of the bonnet. I don't latch it down. Then i put the cover on. Since i want to disconnect the battery anyway when storing, there is really no additional advantage to an external plug location.

charleyf Silver Member Charley Fitch
Redding, California, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "MR.T"
Bob,
Your idea has merit. A simple two prong plug in connection could be set up and put anywhere like through the grille ending behind the front bumper guard. I have a tow car that I pull behind my RV and it is set up with a trickle charger. I note that it has a 10 amp fuse inline on the hot side. If only a trickle charger is used I would expect the wire size to be small. But you would not want to use a full sized charger without heavier wires. Make sure you put the female side of the plug on the car and maybe have a cover for it as well.
Charley

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pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
Thank both of you for the response.

The only use for this type connection would be the trickle charger. It will probable be a Sears Die Hard model. DO yo think the fuse would be necessary?

I was even thinking about using an old pill bottle to hold the plug. Drill hole in the bottom, feed wire through and put some silcone caulk on the hole to seal it. Remove the top to plug in the the charger. Should keep water and dirt out.

How does this sound?

Bob

Peter-K Peter K
Central, Maine, USA   USA
Trickle chargers are not good for batteries. Instead use a float charger. Deltran has several models all of which (I think) have an SAE two prong quick connect which use either batter clips or an optional quick disconnect that connects directly to the battery terminals. Deltran are the best float chargers that will actually charge a battery unlike some cheaper brands models.

Two items you need: (search Amazon or Google)

1- Battery Tender 021-0123 Battery Tender Junior 12V, 0.75A Battery Charger (there's a larger model that I use with faster charging ability)
2- Deltran Battery Tender 081-0069-6 Charger Quick Disconnect

pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
Thank you for the reply

I suspect I used the wrong terminology when I said trickle charger. I believe that all of the chargers I have are battery maintainers. They are designed to only charge the battery when the voltage drops to a predetermined level. The ones I have do have the 2 prong quick connect. Unfortunately, the quick connect is less than 2 feet long. Too short to connect to the battery and reach an area where it can be connected the the charger. I could use an old extension cord to connect directly to the battery and run that wire to the front of the car where I could wire it to the quick connect.

The chargers I have do not have inline fuses. I am still questioning if I should install one.

Thought?

Bob

CJD john durant
Southlake, Texas, USA   USA
I have a LOT of vehicles that sit over the winter. I used to have them all on maintainers. I eventually realized that all the batteries on the maintainers were only lasting 2-3 years. The batteries I stored without maintainers, but which I either charged or drove once per month, were lasting 5 years or more.

I no longer use maintainers. Instead I make it a point to connect a charger or drive the car once every month or two.



John
Southlake, TX

'55 TR2

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TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
I have had a float charger malfunction and melt the case. Fortunately it didn't catch fire, but it might have. A fuse seems like a good idea to me if there is even a small chance it will prevent a fire. The maintainer I use came with the fuse and a longer cord to the quick connect.

Extending the quick connect to the grill should work fine. An alternative is to put the entire maintainer under the hood and lead the AC power cord out. That would mean you have to open and close the hood twice per season, perhaps not too bad a burden.

There are a lot of different grades of battery "maintainers"; some use better algorithms than others. The problem is compounded because the term "float charge" can mean different things. Ideally, the charger should have at least 3 modes : first a constant current until the voltage rises to a specific level, then a constant voltage (which some people call a "float charge" ) for some time, then a phase where no power is applied and the battery voltage is monitored until it falls to a particular level (which others call the "float" charge or phase. The voltage points also have to be adjusted for temperature, it takes more voltage to fully charge a cold battery.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-25 06:23 AM by TR3driver.

pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
I was not aware that using a battery maintainer would damage a battery causing a reduced life for the battery. I had assumed that keeping the battery at peak charge over an extended time would help extend the life of the battery

I am curious if other forum members have had problems with their batteries due to long term use of a battery maintainer.

Bob

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR3B
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
I did research before choosing the battery tender. I found no matter what option you choose people have stories good and bad. I had to just choose what seemed like a commonly used option and go with that, assuming it wouldn't be commonly used if it wasn't generally a positive experience. Howse that for a ringing endorsement?

pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
Thank you for the reply and information

Bob

Mrv8q K Browne
Los Angeles, CA, USA   USA
I use a Deltran Battery Tender Jr,. it has an inline fuse, and two prong disconnect.
The connector is six feet down the line, so I run it under the carbs, and it ends behind the right front tire.
To drive the car, I turn off the BT, disconnect the connector, and I have a velcro tie wrap to wrap the
6 ft. End and tie it to the battery tie down. Away I go.

Takes less than a minute. I also use a twist off battery disconnect.
Nice little system that plays well together.
My first battery lasted just over 9 years with this setup.



Kevin Browne
TS 58370L

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
In reply to # 1494598 by Mrv8q My first battery lasted just over 9 years with this setup.
That's good to hear, Thanks! I bought one last year, to put on a $300 set of batteries (2 six volts in series), in hopes that would make them last longer. Obviously too soon to say if it will actually extend the life, but it kept them up very well through an Indiana winter (which routinely kills car batteries without the tender).



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

pcsbob Robert Wilkins
Franklin, TN, USA   USA
1957 Triumph TR3 "TR3"
1970 MG MGB "Greenie"
1973 MG MGB
I ran my remote battery connection line this weekend. The termination extends to the grill which allows it to be easily connected to the maintainer. I can tuck inside the grill when not it use. I left enough slack in the line so I can move the connection point around a bit should I decide on a different location.

I am now beginning to question if I used have selected better wire. I used an old extension cord.

I would appreciate any input on is this was a bad decision?

Thanks

Bob


Attachments:
TR3 Battery Chrge Connection Point 110517.jpeg    62.3 KB
TR3 Battery Chrge Connection Point 110517.jpeg

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
Since it's done, I'd leave it until you see signs it needs to be improved. Indoor grade cord generally doesn't like sun, heat (or oil); but it isn't likely to fail overnight either. Watch for color changes, cracking or stiffness in the insulation.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

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