TRExp

TR2 & TR3 Forum

newbie to wiring

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Duckspuddle Joe Davis
Drakes Branch, Virginia, USA   USA
I've just ordered a wiring harness and hope to wire my 59 TR3A this winter. I've never wired a car before. Frankly, I've found the electrical part of dealing with an LBC the most difficult. It looks like the harness does not come with any ends, fasteners etc... What supplies should I be gathering? I've got the tools I need (I think) Any suggestions about how to pursue this? Any tidbits or secrets would be appreciated
Joe

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
IMO get a good Weller soldering gun, and some good rosin core "electronic" solder (preferably with lead) and learn to use them. Soldering is not difficult, but it is a skill to learn. And it is the second best way to make electrical joints, with the first being a combination of crimp and solder.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

charleyf Silver Member Charley Fitch
Redding, California, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "MR.T"
Joe,
Your early car has few fasteners and uses a lot of screw down terminals. You don't need anything for those but a screw driver. Best to look at your car and then determine if and what you need to replace. A lot of our cars have had later style replacements added to the cars. So you could be looking at something other than stock features. Again best to look hard at what is coming off.

One thing that I would suggest is to get a bunch of colored plastic ties, likely available at most auto parts stores. Use these to mark EVERY wire that comes off of the car. So put a same colored tie on the wire and on what it came off of. Then once the old harness is out of the car you can use a third same colored tie to put on that same wire in the new harness. Then you only have to match that new wire to the same colored tie on the part on the car. I have tried to use masking tape in the past as a substitute for the ties but found that poor penmanship and attrition or time has rendered those labels unreadable. If you are willing to leave those ties on the wires in unseen areas, they can be a big help later on if you have to visit that area again. In visible areas I always remove the ties once the car is finished.
Charley

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Triumphgt6er Avatar
Triumphgt6er Jim Snell
Cave Creek, Arizona, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Bubbles"
In reply to # 1485350 by charleyf
One thing that I would suggest is to get a bunch of colored plastic ties, likely available at most auto parts stores. Use these to mark EVERY wire that comes off of the car. So put a same colored tie on the wire and on what it came off of. Then once the old harness is out of the car you can use a third same colored tie to put on that same wire in the new harness. Then you only have to match that new wire to the same colored tie on the part on the car. I have tried to use masking tape in the past as a substitute for the ties but found that poor penmanship and attrition or time has rendered those labels unreadable. If you are willing to leave those ties on the wires in unseen areas, they can be a big help later on if you have to visit that area again. In visible areas I always remove the ties once the car is finished.
Charley
Excellent tip. I've always used a label maker, but it's time consuming. The ties sounds WAY faster. Thanks!

Duckspuddle Joe Davis
Drakes Branch, Virginia, USA   USA
Hey Charley
Thanks for replying THis car is a blank slate. I've hobbled together at least a couple of cars to make this one. I need to post pictures as this has been quite an adventure. Needless to say, all the components are either new or reconditioned by me. All are screw on except the flasher. I've draped the harness through the car, and mostly, it makes sense. I know that I will have to make connections for the lights. I was wondering if anyone could give an estimate of what connectors I will need to buy. I haven't figured out how to add the OD wiring to the harness yet. I'll post progress. I suspect I will have lots of questions
Joe

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
The OD wiring doesn't run through the main harness, it has its own. It taps into the original wiring in two places, which on earlier cars were the hot terminal on the starter pushbutton, and the battery side of the ammeter.

The wire from the starter pushbutton (which is just switched power from the ignition switch; the starter switch only serves as a tie point) runs over to the control switch to the left of the steering wheel (for LHD cars).
On my 58, the wire from the other side if the switch ran back to the vicinity of the ignition switch through a vinyl sleeve (along with the first wire) then through another vinyl sleeve along with the wire from the ammeter down to the relay on the back of the battery box.
Two more wires in a third sleeve ran from the relay to the gearbox itself. I think they were originally routed under the carpet and through the rubber grommet on the side of the tunnel, but I re-routed mine through a hole in the firewall to make it easier to R&R the tunnel without messing with the wires.

I don't know if the new harnesses come with bullet connectors or not. But there are a bunch of them for both front and rear lights. You'll also need an assortment of sleeves, both 2 opening and 4 opening. The original setup also used 6 opening sleeves, but they were NLA last time I checked. Use three if the 2 opening sleeves instead.

There are two special ground clips used to ground the front lights. Might be available now, but were NLA when I went through this. So I made up some short jumpers with bullets in one end and ring terminals on the other. Combined with a 4 opening sleeve, they make an effective substitute for the clips.

At the rear, Triumph relied on the mounting screws and clips to ground the rear fixtures. I've seen a lot of problems with that arrangement, so instead I made up a ground wire with a bullet for each fixture, and a ring terminal to go under a fuel tank bolt. I also grounded the fuel sender to the same place.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

6TTR3A Frank Conklin
San Diego,CA, USA   USA
All good tips so far, especially learning to solder.
If you are going to attach the wires to the instruments and switches on the center facia,
use a 1/4" open end wrench or a miniature Crescent wrench to hold the wiring posts while
you loosen/tighten the screws. That's a 50 year old switch you're working with and the
plastic switch body won't handle much "torque"
Solder the ends of any bare wires going to a screw connector. Makes for a more
corrosion resistant joint.
I found it easier to use the wiring diagram that uses color code numbers
(57 for black, 4 for blue with a white stripe, 36 for brown with a blue stripe etc)
rather than B for black, UW for blue with a white stripe NU for brown with a blue stripe.
Again with the facia, there are some wires from one switch to another that aren't included
in the complete harness.
I've added a couple of photos that might help.
Frank

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Attachments:
Loom to facia..jpg    47.3 KB
Loom to facia..jpg

Rear_Std panel_Std Temp.JPG    35.5 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
One disadvantage that I've found to putting solder on the strands going into a clamp connector is that the strands tend to break from vibration right at the surface of the solder. So it's better IMO to keep the solder only on the very tip of the wire, so the screw bears partially on the untinned portion.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

Jacad Avatar
Jacad Gold Member Barry Shefner
Montreal, QC, Canada   CAN
1959 Triumph TR3A "Loose Wheels"
1976 Triumph TR6 "The Tweetster"
Joe,

most supplied harnesses that i've seen come with end connectors so I would double check with your supplier. You will need a supply of bullet connectors and British Wiring is a great source http://www.britishwiring.com/category-s/266.htm start with the cB1 pack and add what you need. Wonderful source for correct color wire for sub harnesses as well.

BTW, you can either solder your bullet connectors or you can buy a crimping tool for $60 and crimp them if you do not feel confident soldering them on.



Barry
59 TR3A 0TS57675LO - "Loose Wheels"
76 TR6 CF54266U - "The Tweetster"
Website: Triumph TR2-TR3-TR4 www.trtriumph.com/ (sorry for not keeping it current for the past couple of years)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-18 04:23 PM by Jacad.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster