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How to front coilovers

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Same ones but cut down. The ebay ones are about 5" long, full size on the fronts, but they should only be about 3" in the rear. The Afco ones come in 5 or 7, so if you go the more expensive route, you can buy a 7 for the rear and cut it in half.

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parrisw William P
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 955491 by TR8todd Same ones but cut down. The ebay ones are about 5" long, full size on the fronts, but they should only be about 3" in the rear. The Afco ones come in 5 or 7, so if you go the more expensive route, you can buy a 7 for the rear and cut it in half.

Thanks

Will

Zobeltek Scott Zobel
Wisconsin Dells, WI, USA   USA
Scott in Wisconsin here. New to the forum and back in a tr7 after 20 years. Can anyone tell me if 150 lb springs would be suitable in a tr7 coil over conversion. I see that the 200 lb springs were liked in the tr8. Not sure about the weight differences between 7 and 8s with alum vs cast blocks and all. Specific parts, numbers, manufacturers or suppliers appreciated as well. Much thanks.

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
There isn't a commercially available take it out of the box and bolt it on kit. Maybe there is some specialty shop that will build you a set, possibly over in England, but they will be ridiculously expensive. Your best bet is to make up a set. Even if you go top of the line parts, the threaded collars are going to be anywhere from $50 to $200. Good Eibach or similar coilover springs are about $75 a piece. 150# is going to be very soft. I consider 200 to be on the soft side and 300 to be very firm. Most of my friends are running 250#. The weight difference between TR7 and TR8 is negligible. The TR8 is around 100 heavier, but thats mostly due to the AC, power steering, luggage racks, and every other thing they liked to bolt on to the higher end models. Depending on what your car has for accessories, and what weight saving reductions/additions, your wedge is going to weigh somewhere between 2200 and 2550 pounds. The front wheels will carry roughly somewhere around 650 pounds each and the rears will carry around 550 pounds each when the car is just sitting there. How heavy you and your passenger are is going to have a bigger effect on spring rates that what you have done to change the stock weight of your car. If you are serious about going this route, and get in over your head, just give me a shout. I'll be glad to help out.

mrkenmgb Avatar
mrkenmgb Ken DeLEEUW
Ormond Beach, FL, USA   USA
1996 MG MGF "Green Machine"
Todd
How about a set for a TR-7?
Ken

TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
They would be the same whether on a 7 or an 8.

trekcarbonboy Avatar
trekcarbonboy Craig Hall
Perkasie, PA, USA   USA
Todd I was wondering if the bushings seen in the picture below would negate the need to add anything to the top of the spring mount. It seems they would do the trick for holding the springs in place. Any thoughts?
I am going to do this project and thought it would save time and effort. I am a complete novice on this topic so I thought I would run it by you.
The pictured kit is only a picture I found that showed the bushings clearly, not something I have purchased.

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Those are essentially spring rubbers. You still should have something solid to take the sideways force on the spring. Welding in a new "cup" gives the spring a solid locater and a nice flat metal surface to bear the load. How long is a piece of plastic going to stand up to the kind of compression forces the car will generate? You will be relying on the plastic held in place by just the shock rod. Sure it will work, but I'd bet it will tear itself apart in short order.

TR3barton Avatar
TR3barton John Taylor
Greenfield, MA, USA   USA
Hello,

The top of the spring needs to be retained by something. I do not know what this top is made out of. It may be just fine. In Todd’s design does he let the top of the spring rest on the TR body?

I spent 30 years racing cars that had coil over suspensions and most of the top hats had slots in them so they could be changed to accommodate different
length springs. I remember one Formula Ford that used different hats front than back.

I think I would look for a hat that presented the spring in the middle of the adjustment perch.

John

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
The way I make them up, you use all of the stock top components, but you weld in a retainer on the metal cup to locate the smaller diameter spring. I've also done several where the entire top assembly is discarded and universal camber plates are fitted. If you simply just put threaded perches on top of the stock spring perch located on the strut housing, you still have to remove the whole thing to do spring changes. I grind away the lower perch and then weld on new collars down where the brake hose clip is located. This allows you to spin the perch down several inches putting the spring in droop. Unbolt the top shock retaining nut and the shock shaft drops down. Now you can swap springs without removing the whole assembly. Install new spring, pull shaft back into place and attache the nut, spin spring perch back up. You still can't run the bottom of the spring perch any lower than what was stock because the tire is right there. When I do the rears, its done a similar way, but upside down. The threaded collar is on top. Tried it on the bottom, but because of the ever changing deflection in the rear spring caused by the control arm moving up and down, it just didn't work out as well. In the rear you inevitably end up with shorter stiffer springs that will fall out in full droop, so fitting axle limit straps like on the MGB are essential. The first pic shows the new retaining clip for the sleeve held in place tightly with a clamp right before welding. The second pic shows a completed top assembly.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-01-20 05:40 AM by TR8todd.


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VJTR7 Versile Johnson
Poteau, OK, USA   USA
Hey, I really appreciate the in depth write up here. I've been prepping my TR7 for this conversion and replacing all the ball joints etc at the same time. I, however, cannot for the life of me find the adjustable spring mount/perch. Do you have a part # or ebay link to something I can get? Also do you run the stock strut insert or something else?

TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
You can order up a generic set off of Ebay for around $50 and then throw away the springs. The other option is to order up really good ones from Afco or ground control. Those will set you back about $70 per side. I'll look out in the garage and see if there is a box with a part number on it from the Ebay ones I bought last time. With the bay Chinese units, you can pick a color. They don't tell you how long they are, but you want to make sure you get ones that are at least 5" long. The springs I always run are Eibach 2.5" coilover springs, and those are around $65-70 a piece. There are other cheaper options, I just prefer Eibach. The insert is going to depend entirely on the spring rate you want to run. For a street car, the KYBs should be fine. You get into autocross and track day rates of springs, and the KYBs will be overstressed and fail quickly. KYB should be good up to about 275 pound rated springs, and on a 7, you don't want to go any higher than that for a street car. I recently picked up a set of shocks for the car I'm building with the LS3. They are Koni double adjustable race inserts and cost a lot more than KYBs. On my street cars, I like to run Koni single adjustable race inserts.

VJTR7 Versile Johnson
Poteau, OK, USA   USA
Thanks for the quick reply, this write up is amazing. Based on what you're saying I'm looking at Afco 29022 (7"winking smiley and a KYB item # h984 single adjustable gas strut insert for a 91-95 Toyota MR2. Paired with a 10" 200 or 9" 225 spring. Still struggling with how I'm going to do the brakes.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-15 11:20 AM by VJTR7.

parrisw William P
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
I think I’m running 8” 250lb springs. Be careful with 10”, you may not be able to get ride height low enough. I have mine adjusted as low as it can, and I want it a little lower. But I’m also running 16” rims.

Will

In reply to # 1502832 by VJTR7 Thanks for the quick reply, this write up is amazing. Based on what you're saying I'm looking at Afco 29022 (7"winking smiley and a KYB item # h984 single adjustable gas strut insert for a 91-95 Toyota MR2. Paired with a 10" 200 or 225 spring.

TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Found the box that the last set of Ebay coilover came in, but the part numbers are not informative. You just need to make sure you get the longer ones. If the ad says 0 to 4" adjustability, those should do you. Some of the ads only say 0 to 2". I'm guessing those are the short ones. Most of them generically say they fit Honda, Acura. Pick a color. Try to buy a set that the seller gives you the most info on. 250# rate springs are right at the crossover point. 250# 10 should work for a decent ride height unless you have a taller tire than stock. 275# 10" will ride a little high. If you want 275# or stiffer, you will either have to find a 9" spring or use an 8" Eibach. Of course, the length of the spring ultimately comes down to what you do for a top mount. Numbers above are for utilizing the stock rubber upper ,aunts modified to keep the 2.5" spring from walking around. My LS3 powered car has an aluminum cup for a top mount right up against a camber plate, with a roller bearing sandwiched between them. Need a longer spring on this setup.

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