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TR7 5 speed gear oil change

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geoffreyk Avatar
geoffreyk Geoff Kearley
Conception Bay South, Topsail, Newfoundland, Canada   CAN
I am about to replace the gear oil in the 5 speed of my 1980 TR7. I haven't consulted the manual yet. I don't know what's in the gearbox now so I plan to drain it and replace it. Should I flush the gearbox or just drain it well and fill it with the new oil? Is this a driveway job or do I need a lift? Can anyone say if I'll have issues getting the oil to run in or will I need a pump or some kind of complicated elevated vessel to fill the gearbox from?

The NEW recommended oil is GM - AC Delco # 10903509 at $13.68 Cdn a quart. There is a Quaker State [Pennzoil] equivalent for $14.43 a quart.

Geoff

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British Steel Jon Canupp
Monroe, NC, USA   USA
You can do this in the driveway. No need to flush the system. Just drain well and you can use a oil squirt can to refill the transmission. It takes a little while with the can, but it is less expensive than buying a bunch of tools that you only need once a year. As far as oil goes, I have read where a 75/90 semi synthetic is a good oil for the gearbox. Good luck with it. Cheers, Jon

geoffreyk Avatar
geoffreyk Geoff Kearley
Conception Bay South, Topsail, Newfoundland, Canada   CAN
Thanks Jon,
I just scored 2 heavy duty metal wheel ramps and 2 axle stands for $20 at a garage sale. These will give me about 15 inches of room under the car so I will go ahead and try to drain and fill the gearbox in the driveway. I think I will rig up a squeeze bag or plunger instead of an oil can...but I'll keep that in mind if all else fails.

I did a good bit of reading and it seems that to avoid the stiff when cold baulking I should use GM AC/Delco Synchromesh ATF fluid. This is better suited to the LT77 gearbox than regular ATF because it has foaming inhibitors, good brass/copper/bronze protection, good non-metal protection and excellent lubrication heat range.

Do you have any experience with analyzing the characteristics of the waste fluid? What do you call it swarsh or swarth or something? I am wondering what I can learn from looking at the old gear oil. Metal filings would be bad but what else should I look for; colour, foam, smell, particulate,etc?
Geoff

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geoffreyk Avatar
geoffreyk Geoff Kearley
Conception Bay South, Topsail, Newfoundland, Canada   CAN
I just had the gearbox oil changed from normal ATF to the proper gear oil. It made a big difference in gear whine, smoothness of shifting and ease of selecting reverse.

yellowbookroad Avatar
yellowbookroad Gareth T
Somewhere in, Estonia   EST
1970 Triumph 2.5 PI MkII "Permanently NICKED Nickname"
Forget using ATF.
Use a fully synthetic gear oil such as Motul.

Those things didn't exist in the days they made that old gearbox, and it will make it much nicer to use.

ATF was really a mistake from the BL days, and it's not the only 5 speed that benefits from proper modern oil.

(BMW/Jaguar also is much better).

AroostookTR7 Avatar
AroostookTR7 Keith Brown
Washburn, Maine, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead "Geraldine"
I too bought a 1980 TR7 this spring, and changed the gearbox fluid to Penzoil syncromesh.
Problem is, there were some metal filings on the drain plug magnet. They look extensive on the magnet but did not amount to much on the rag. The oil did not look bad, however.

How bad is this news, and what am I in for ?


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ChuckyBaby12 Avatar
ChuckyBaby12 Charlie D.
Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
From a fellow Newfie Geoff. I currently live in Port Coquitlam, BC. since 1988. I have an 81 TR8. My brother and very good friend live up that way in Conception bay.

All my buddy and I use is a long piece of clear tubing that fits into the top fill hole smaller than the hole for air escape purposes, a small funnel and a buddy underneath to watch for overflow with rags and a pan. My friend used the GM stuff recommended above. I'm about to change mind also and most likely will use that too.

PM if you need more info.

Charlie

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Buy two bottles of Pennzoil synchromesh and a 2' long piece of 3/8" clear tubing from the home center. Cut the end of the pointed nipple on the Pennzoil bottle and force the tubing over the hole and end of the nipple. Squeeze bottle and fluid miraculously travels up into the fill hole on the tranny. Once it starts getting difficult to squeeze more fluid into the tranny, refill the bottle you are using with the second bottle. Continue until the fluid starts to run out of the fill hole. Put all of the remaining fluid into one bottle and throw away the empty one. This can be done under the car and takes a few minutes. Same trick works on the rear end.

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
Keith,

Depending on your mileage this could just be normal wear(there's a reason they put that magnetic plug in there). Also check the old oil, it usually has a slight metallic sheen(fairly normal)if you see more than that(heavy metallic sheen, or metal bits) you may have a problem. Your biggest indicator is how it shifts, if it shifts normally I wouldn't worry about it, just keep it topped up and oil changed at regular intervals.

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lgray001 Avatar
lgray001 Gold Member Larry Gray
Lexington, VA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR7 "POS-2"
1979 Triumph TR7 "The Money Pit"
I ran a string a few months ago and the general consensus (about 10 replies) was to use Pennzoil Synchromesh as the best overall.


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M1kem3 Avatar
M1kem3 Michael Rawlins
San Antonio, Texas, USA   USA
What's the grade? I've heard it's the best as well, and want to use the oil in my TR8
In reply to # 1464832 by lgray001 I ran a string a few months ago and the general consensus (about 10 replies) was to use Pennzoil Synchromesh as the best overall.

Bergie Bob Berg
Powell, Ohio, USA   USA
This is the gm fluid....auto zone has a cheap fluid transfer pump you can use and keep in a plastic bag for use again...


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Bluewedge Avatar
Bluewedge Mark S.
Mayhill, New Mexico, USA   USA
1955 MG TF 1500 "John's MG"
1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead
I too use the clear plastic tubing and funnel technique. The tubing is long enough to tie the funnel to the side mirror. To speed up the filling process I fill a bucket with hot water and let the trans fluid containers warm up.

Here's a question for the experts: The previous time I changed the fluid I lived near sea level in Houston, Texas and did not overfill the trans. I now live at 7800 ft. elevation and when I removed the fill plug a good amount of fluid poured out. Could this have been because of the lower ambient air pressure? Car was cold both times. It's a mystery.

Mark

TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Can't compress a liquid. Must have something to do with the slope of the ground your were on both times and the angle which the car is sitting. Ideally you want the car level when you add the fluid.

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
Mark,

Your seeming overfill could be for number of reasons; when you squeezed it into the tranny it may have not had enough time to flow back to level, you may have trapped oil in a portion of the tranny which couldn't get back to level until the car had been run. In any case on level ground if you pull the fill plug and get a little overflow drip, it's just about perfect. Todd is mostly correct as far as the non compressibility of liquids used in our cars goes(brake fluid, etc.) however some liquids are quite compressible such as jet fuel which is why they measure it in weight not volume.

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