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EGR removed.. do I need to plug the manifold?

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RossL Ross LoMonaco
New Jersey, USA   USA
My car has a stock manifold and the EGR is removed. Should there be a plug in the manifold? There is a threaded port between the carbs, I assume this were the EGR was installed....

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1497932 by RossL My car has a stock manifold and the EGR is removed. Should there be a plug in the manifold? There is a threaded port between the carbs, I assume this were the EGR was installed....

Ross:

Yes, the intake and the exhaust manifold should both be plugged, assuming that you do not get tested/inspected for emissions.

Better would be to reinstall the EGR, as it increases highway mileage by about 4%, and it costs nothing in terms of performance.

Your call.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

RossL Ross LoMonaco
New Jersey, USA   USA
Hi Vance,

The car did not come with the EGR, at this time I do not need it for inspection. I may try to source a used one just to have it.

The exhaust manifold has a plug but the fitting on the intake (between the two carbs) does not. The car seems to be running fine, maybe there is a plate under the fitting?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-15 09:20 AM by RossL.

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TR8 Manifold Fitting.jpg

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1497996 by RossL Hi Vance,

The car did not come with the EGR, at this time I do not need it for inspection. I may try to source a used one just to have it.

The exhaust manifold has a plug but the fitting on the intake (between the two carbs) does not. The car seems to be running fine, maybe there is a plate under the fitting?

With a hole that big, it must be plugged underneath that fitting. The car would barely run, and would probably stall at idle. GENTLY insert a probe into the fitting, and I bet you find it is plugged, perhaps by a home made gasket fitted underneath that fitting.

BTW, the threads in that fitting (and the EGR for that matter) are very nonstandard as they are a British Fine Pipe Thread, which has no readily available American equivalent. That is probably why it has no plug in it. The big three source the compression nuts that fit in those threads, but AFAIK there is no readily available plug from them. You could retap the threads for a NPT pipe plug, but I do not recommend it if you think you might reinstall the EGR. If you do, I would insure that you can obtain 1/2" compression nuts that fit the new threads - I am guessing they are readily available, but it would be a shame to retap it only to find out you cannot reinstall the EGR for lack of compression nuts.

The EGR valves are ridiculously expensive as they are no longer made, so NOS valves run into hundreds of dollars. But you can pick up used ones on eBay and from these guys: British Auto Works. They answer their emails. NFI. I picked one up from them for $20. Ask them to verify that it holds vacuum, as they can and do fail.

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

RossL Ross LoMonaco
New Jersey, USA   USA
In reply to # 1498005 by Darth V8R

With a hole that big, it must be plugged underneath that fitting. The car would barely run, and would probably stall at idle. GENTLY insert a probe into the fitting, and I bet you find it is plugged, perhaps by a home made gasket fitted underneath that fitting.

BTW, the threads in that fitting (and the EGR for that matter) are very nonstandard as they are a British Fine Pipe Thread, which has no readily available American equivalent. That is probably why it has no plug in it. The big three source the compression nuts that fit in those threads, but AFAIK there is no readily available plug from them. You could retap the threads for a NPT pipe plug, but I do not recommend it if you think you might reinstall the EGR. If you do, I would insure that you can obtain 1/2" compression nuts that fit the new threads - I am guessing they are readily available, but it would be a shame to retap it only to find out you cannot reinstall the EGR for lack of compression nuts.

The EGR valves are ridiculously expensive as they are no longer made, so NOS valves run into hundreds of dollars. But you can pick up used ones on eBay and from these guys: British Auto Works. They answer their emails. NFI. I picked one up from them for $20. Ask them to verify that it holds vacuum, as they can and do fail.

Cheers,

Vance

I contacted the PO and he said it is plugged. I thought the same if there was an opening that big, it would be noticeable. What else do I need to source besides the EGR Valve, some plumbing? Are these valves generic and used for other cars? I couldn't imagine that many TR8 valves being available

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1498020 by RossL
I contacted the PO and he said it is plugged. I thought the same if there was an opening that big, it would be noticeable. What else do I need to source besides the EGR Valve, some plumbing? Are these valves generic and used for other cars? I couldn't imagine that many TR8 valves being available

The TR7 and TR6 used the same EGR valve, and probably some others (MGB?). There were many of them made, so you should be able to pick one up that works.

In addition to the valve, you will need the two compression nuts, two 1/2" compression olives, and some 1/2" copper tubing (tubing, not pipe), and an insulating sleeve. The tubing and olives you can get at any hardware store. You will also need some vacuum tubing (Moss) and a couple of vacuum tubing elbows (also Moss) to connect it to the carb. For the insulating sleeve, I used some 1" oven door gasket from the hardware store - it has an inner core that simply slips out, leaving a nice 1" hollow insulating sleeve. I slipped it over the tube, and secured it at the end with hose clamps from my junk drawer.

You will need to have a good tubing bender to shape the 1/2" tubing, as it makes a pretty sharp bend as it comes out of the valve and turns up to avoid the fire wall. I found I could not get a sharp enough bend without crimps to clear the firewall. So I substituted 1/2" ID stainless corrugated tubing, and crimped the stainless tubing onto two 2" pieces of copper tubing (sealed with red RTV). Then I could bend the EGR pipe by hand to any shape I wanted. I will see if I can find the supplier of the SS tubing. It was hard to find in 1/2" ID, although lots of people carried the 1/2" OD stuff.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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