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Fuel dripping

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Fuel dripping
#1
  This topic is about my 1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead
bcbennett Avatar
bcbennett Silver Member Brad B
Abilene, Texas, USA   USA
Hello all,

My garage was smelling strongly of gas fumes, so I jacked up my car and looked underneath. I have a small gasoline drip (about two drops per minute) falling from the slave cylinder. I know there's no gas in there, so I spend a half hour searching for a broken fuel hose or line, but found nothing. Could it be seeping from the fuel pump, just above the cylinder? Is this a likely culprit for a fuel drip?

Thanks,

Brad

1980 TR7

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nick Avatar
nick nick m
Bend, OR, USA   USA
Put a wrench to the pump and see if it is lose. There is a gasket behind it as well. Look for fuel staining under the carb floats.



nick

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1496531 by bcbennett Hello all,

My garage was smelling strongly of gas fumes, so I jacked up my car and looked underneath. I have a small gasoline drip (about two drops per minute) falling from the slave cylinder. I know there's no gas in there, so I spend a half hour searching for a broken fuel hose or line, but found nothing. Could it be seeping from the fuel pump, just above the cylinder? Is this a likely culprit for a fuel drip?

Thanks,

Brad

1980 TR7

Brad:

Pull your dip stick and note the oil level. Is it too high? Smell the oil on the dip stick. Does it smell like gas? In either of these cases, the fuel pump has failed and is leaking into the crankcase. You must change the oil and replace the fuel pump.

Even if the oil in your crankcase is fine, the fuel pump is the most likely culprit. They have a rubber diaphragm in them, and after 40 years they blow chunks. Years ago on my TR7 the pump started leaking and I could smell gas, with a damp spot under the car. It started and ran OK, but I expected the car to burst into flames on the drive home. A new fuel pump fixed it right up.

Be careful when you get a replacement. There are two different styles (with different length pump levers), and one of them requires a spacer and longer bolts so that the pump lever correctly engages the jack shaft. If you get it wrong, the pump never operates and you get a no start condition.

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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bcbennett Avatar
bcbennett Silver Member Brad B
Abilene, Texas, USA   USA
Thanks for all this advice--I suppose a new pump is in order. And I remember replacing the one on my '79 wedge I drove in the 90s; I looked at the spacer and thought, "What the heck is this?" I soon found out.

As I recall, I didn't have to drain the tank, but just somehow stop up the fuel lines, right?

Az7fan Avatar
Az7fan Paul Dorman
Tempe, Arizona, USA   USA
Golf tees make a great plug for the fuel lines when you replace the pump....smileys with beer

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