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TR7 vs Fiat 124

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uspsmech Avatar
uspsmech Jim F
North Providence, rhode island, USA   USA
1978 Triumph TR8 "007"
Another thing I have heard causes wear with the fiat trannys is the practice of always keeping your hand on the shift lever whilst driving. Supposedly this also causes synchro wear. I don't know how but " Fix it agin Tony" told me that one. My 77 has the original trans at 103k with no problem, my 78 has 95k and is just starting to pop out of third, but that is a motor and trans from a 81 2000cc fi car converted to carburation



" Enjoy the Drive", Jim

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Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
In reply to # 1487144 by mgbgt111 I'm patient with all manual gear boxes I drive.

I hear you. This is the way I drive all my cars.



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

mgbgt111 Avatar
mgbgt111 c erskine c
pelham, shelby county, USA   USA
If you are still considering a FIAT 124, here are a couple of links for the 124 that demonstrate the driving position and the difference in sound and experience of the FIAT, if you already know about the TR7.
The cars are two totally different experiences. Both fun!






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TeeR8 Avatar
TeeR8 Gold Member Henri Lefebvre
Calgary, Alberta, Canada   CAN
The driving position of the Fiat 124 is certainly a 'non-starter' for me; never liked it and never considered buying a 124. My personal view.
Same with Alfa Romeo of those years otherwise I would have bought a GTV a long time ago.

YMMV.



Henri
1980 TR8, Platinum
1971 MGB GT, Midnight Blue

Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
C & Henri,

My brother had a 124 years ago -- oh, maybe 35 or so years ago -- and I know the driving position, at least the angle of the steering wheel, is different compared to the English cars. I didn't really like it, but I'd never experience anything like it before, so I think it is something that just takes a little getting used to. I have gone back and reread articles from the late 60s and early 70s comparing the 124 to other sports cars in its price range, and all of the reviews seem to rate the 124 above the other cars of that era. Generally the MGBs come in last and the TRs somewhere in between. The Porsche (Volkswagen) 914 seems a close competitor, but I never cared for the way it looked. If I found a 124 in really good condition, I wouldn't let the driving position be a deal breaker.

Thanks for your input.

Doug



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

79bluespit Avatar
79bluespit Rick Lazio
Burlington, ON, Canada   CAN
With these cars there's always going to be something you have to live with. Its what makes them charming and bristling with character or we'd all be driving miatas.

Give yourself a list of 4 criteria in order of importance. Mine went like this...

1. Looks. I have to love how the car looks.- for me this ended up being the spitfire.

2. How does it make me feel when I'm driving it? If I don't have a smile on my face then forget it.

3. Legroom. Can't do without legroom. I'm tall.

4. Parts availability and cost.

Car performance was not an issue in any way. Non of these old euro trash cars, even when hopped up could keep up with the mom in the minivan beside you. These are not rational cars... You buy them for fun and emotion.

My short list came down to...(all convertibles)... For now I'm limber enuf to get in/out of these things... So as time passes my criteria could change.

Midget
124 spider
X19
Mgb
Spitfire
Alfa spider
Lancia zegatto
Tr7
Tr6
Fiat 850

Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
Rick,
A Spridget would be on the top of my list too if it wasn't that I'm looking for something a little larger. I had a '65 Sprite years ago and it was really fun to drive, but a little disconcerting when I'd pull up next to a VW and have to look up. Sometimes even had to do that alongside some motorcycles. winking smiley
Doug



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-12 02:26 PM by Fictioneer.

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sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
Doug,

If you think that's disconcerting, I remember sitting at a light and looking up at the driver of a Midget that had just pulled up at the light. I was driving a Lotus Super Seven and it was RHD so we were sitting on the same side. I could pick up coins off the road(and did)when setting at a light.

lgray001 Avatar
lgray001 Gold Member Larry Gray
Lexington, VA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR7 "POS-2"
1979 Triumph TR7 "The Money Pit"
Let's re-think the Fiat 850. It was cute as a bug, but I had an 850 Spyder and it was a total POS. It would have been better made of Popsicle sticks. An awful car to operate and maintain. I got to be on a first hand name basis with ALL of the Fiat parts desk personnel.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-13 10:21 AM by lgray001.


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sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
Larry,

Let's not forget when Fiat added the ultimate insult to injury with the 850 by making it a hardtop, thus eliminating the car's only virtue.

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Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
When I was in college someone on campus owned a brand new 850. It was green. I called it baby s**t green. You're right, Larry. "Cute as a bug." I was taken by the looks and always wanted one, but never, I reckon, badly enough to buy one.



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

mgbgt111 Avatar
mgbgt111 c erskine c
pelham, shelby county, USA   USA
Why bring up the 850? The question was TR7 vs. 124.
But while we're at it, the 850 was garbage when new, and not to be compared to the 124. smiling smiley The 850 and TR7 were not contemporary cars.

There is no comparison between the 850 and the TR7. For that matter, there is no comparison between the 850 and the Spitfire. Even the X1/9 is not comparable to the TR7, and it's a much better car than the 850.

Rburgess Avatar
Rburgess Randy Burgess
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1475933 by TR8todd Define affordable. Right now is the best time to buy a TR8. They are always the cheapest at the end of the summer and into the early fall. Mid winter(when tax checks come in the mail) is when they are the most expensive. Most likely has to do with supply and demand. Anybody that wanted one for this season has already bought one. People who don't want to store a car for another winter put them up for sale. There was a real nice red one that just sold on eBay for $5K. It was a $10K car all day long after a little sorting out. Owner passed away and the seller didn't do themselves any favors with the description. There is a green one in Washington for $6K that I'd snatch up if it wasn't 3500 miles away.

https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/d/1980-triumph-tr8-convertable/6197687620.html

Do a weekly nation wide craigslist search for TR8s. You can get a sense fairly quickly what the prices are and what you can expect to pay. Bare in mind, most of the ones that sell for way too much seem to be in parts of the country where there aren't many. Here in the Northeast, there are so many, that they seem common. By and large, the TR8s are going to be in better shape than the average TR7 or even the average 124. TR8s are mostly owned by enthusiasts. Not too often you run across one that wasn't. You run across TR7s all the time that were just an old rusty sports car to the owner. TR7s also seem to come with a bunch of parts catalogs, and brand new parts in the trunk that were never installed. TR8s come with shop manuals, original sales literature, old copies of magazine articles, car covers, etc.

I was about take offence at last sentence of this post when it occurred to me that not only is it true, it is pretty darn funny!

lgray001 Avatar
lgray001 Gold Member Larry Gray
Lexington, VA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR7 "POS-2"
1979 Triumph TR7 "The Money Pit"
The 850 coupe wouldn't have been so bad had they not scrapped the 850 convertible front end.


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lgray001 Avatar
lgray001 Gold Member Larry Gray
Lexington, VA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR7 "POS-2"
1979 Triumph TR7 "The Money Pit"
A very lucky choice.


Member Services:
A Small Business serving the aviation community with avionics knowledge.
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