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TR8 Overheating

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tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
Hi Vance,
We're very much on the same page. I can't put it behind the rad because there is little space and no air flow. I'm looking at how to mount it below the headlight in the wheel well.
Mike

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1462674 by tr7v8mike Hi Vance,
We're very much on the same page. I can't put it behind the rad because there is little space and no air flow. I'm looking at how to mount it below the headlight in the wheel well.
Mike

I don't know how big it is... Is placing it where the cold air intake fitting would normally go an option? It would require cutting some sheet metal, perhaps not your cup of tea.

Is the radiator sloped forward in your car? Above the radiator under the nose cone seems like it might be an option as well.

If you were willing to give it an independant electric fan, I suppose you could put it in the trunk!

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
Its 14cm x 28cm. Its too vulnerable to getting whacked if its down in the front spoiler and it interferes with air flow to the rad. There's not enough air flow in the nose and I wouldn't want to have to pump oil up so high, for a couple of reasons. I have a swirl pot in the boot so adding all of that heat to the boot could set my arse on fire in a not very funny way.

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1462739 by tr7v8mike I have a swirl pot in the boot so adding all of that heat to the boot could set my arse on fire in a not very funny way.

Just remember that James Bond had to pay EXTRA to get the smoke coming out of the ass of his Aston Martin.

You, on the other hand, could have it at no extra charge. eye popping smiley

Vance

P.S. One other wild thought. There is a good deal of air moving through the channel between the inner and outer fenders in front. Is there a way to fit it in there, I wonder? The factory used it to channel air into the foot wells in the non-A/C cars through the little doors they so thoughtfully provided..



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
Lol. I loved that car. The big difference is that James just had to throw a switch to turn the smoke off. I'd pay a lot of money for that.
The space between the inner and outer skins is too narrow and I've got the loom to the ECU running through there on the RHS.

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1462857 by tr7v8mike Lol. I loved that car. The big difference is that James just had to throw a switch to turn the smoke off. I'd pay a lot of money for that.
The space between the inner and outer skins is too narrow and I've got the loom to the ECU running through there on the RHS.

Well, nuts!

I hate it when reality gets in the way of a good idea. It makes me highly irregular. sad smiley

I am out of suggestions. If you were only racing, I would say remove the headlights and put it in one of those spaces.

Just how big is this thing, anyway? Is getting a smaller one (or a different shape) an option?

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
It's 14cm x 28cm (you'll have to convert that into the quaint old system you use). I'll mount it below the headlight and see how it goes next summer with the other mods to the cooling system.

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1463018 by tr7v8mike It's 14cm x 28cm (you'll have to convert that into the quaint old system you use).

Yikes!

I will grant you, it is odd. American cars are totally metric, except for the speedometers. Science and most industries are metric too. But government (state, local and federal) are all English. Canada and Mexico are metric. The US may be the last place on earth officially using the English system of measurement. Even the inch is defined in metric terms (1 inch is defined to be 2.54cm exactly)

My Triumph is metric. Well, except the motor.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

Andrew1966 Andrew Ward
Abbotsford, BC, Canada   CAN
My TR8 used to get quite hot. 3/4 or more on the temp guage
Changed to a summer thermostat 165 degrees. Changed coolant to Evans waterless. Temp now reads half and the car runs better than ever.

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1481324 by Andrew1966 My TR8 used to get quite hot. 3/4 or more on the temp guage
Changed to a summer thermostat 165 degrees. Changed coolant to Evans waterless. Temp now reads half and the car runs better than ever.

Andrew:

It probably runs better because a cooler engine makes more power. The incoming air charge is denser (more oxygen) because it is not heated as much by the heads as it is drawn into the cylinders.

The downside is that your oil is not as warm, so it accumulates moisture from combustion blow by. The moisture stays in the oil and forms acids, which shorten engine life. Not a problem if you stay on top of oil changes (3,000 (?) miles. <shrug>winking smiley so that the acids do not accumulate.

I tell people to go no lower than 180F on the street, to keep the oil warm enough that this is not an issue. If you are racing, then of course lower is better on the temperature since you are changing the oil after every race.

If your gauge is reading at 1/2 with the 165 t-stat, it sounds like your gauge is reading a bit high. Gauge center is typically 185-190F but it varies a bit from car to car.

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

Bergie Bob Berg
Powell, Ohio, USA   USA
agree with Vance on the oil temp and t stat at 180 degree for engine oil operation and blow by.....my temp gauge is a hair over the 1/4 mark with 180 degree t stat...check your grounds-temp sender unit threads clean and good contact at intake manifold, engine ground strap and gauge cluster.....bad grounding makes the gauge read higher...see thread below for temp reads which matches mine exactly with a gtr110...also with regard to oil blow by if your using a PCV valve check out ME Wagner unit I installed that also keeps the oil clean without using vacuum pump and works better than any off the shelf unit -read the data on their valve compared to others and you will change right away......



http://www.team.net/TR8/tr8cca/wedgelab/cooling/temp_sender/sender.htm

PCV valve
http://mewagner.com/

darrellwalker Darrell Walker
Vancouver, Washington, USA   USA
1966 Triumph TR4A "Christy"
1981 Triumph TR8 "Kate"
In reply to # 1481419 by Bergie also with regard to oil blow by if your using a PCV valve check out ME Wagner unit I installed that also keeps the oil clean without using vacuum pump and works better than any off the shelf unit -read the data on their valve compared to others and you will change right away......

PCV valve
http://mewagner.com/

I can definitely second the recommendation of the ME Wagner PCV valve. I installed one last week, replacing some off the shelf valve that was using. Has solved a number, if not all, oil leaks that I was having.



Darrell Walker
66 TR4A IRS-SC CTC67956L
81 TR8 SATPZ458XBA406206
Vancouver, WA, USA

tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
Hey,

Back to the original post that started this thread. I've added a couple of pics to show what I've done to improve cooling for the coming summer. I bought a 26x19 radiator which required modifying the bottom bracket and throwing out the two top brackets, cut holes in the shroud for the speed flaps and moved the oil cooler over to the right under the headlamp housing. It was all a bit snug, but its in there. I just need to get the oil pressure gauge installed and I will be back on the road. The weather is still mild so it will be a while before the new set-up gets a proper test.

Cheers

Mike


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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Looks like overkill, but overkill is good. My only concern is the white plastic elbow above the water pump. I had a similar one in my cooling system and it developed a leak. Tightened the clamps and it leaked more. The heat caused the nylon fitting to distort. I even see plastic fitting do this on water well systems where the water temp is around 50*F. For that reason I always use brass barbed fittings on well piping and copper or brass fittings on my cars cooling systems.

tr7v8mike Avatar
tr7v8mike Gold Member Michael Booth
SYDNEY, NSW, Australia   AUS
Yeah, I’m a big fan overkill. Thanks for the tip on the white plastic, I’ll replace it.

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