TRExp

TR7 & TR8 Forum

Towing a TR7

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Grubeguy Avatar
Grubeguy Grube Guy
Washington, DC, USA   USA
I'm thinking of giving my TR7 to my brother instead of selling it ... Can he hook up a tow bar and pull the car back to the southwest with his truck? Assuming the TR7 is in neutral all the way and the wheel lock disengaged, would there be any damage done to the TR7's tranny?

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Yes, unless you remove the driveshaft.

navydiver Rob Cornick
san diego, california, USA   USA
1975 Triumph TR7 "The Pumpkin"
1977 Triumph TR7
1978 Triumph TR8
1980 Triumph TR7 "The Plum"    & more
4spd no problem, 5spd will potentially die. You can tow a 5spd on a dolly backwheels first or as Todd says disconnect the prop shaft at the diff end and let it hang on the retaining loop.
I usually use a u haul auto trailer the extra weight of a wedge will test the brakes on most vehicles if you use the dolly for any great distance.



1975 TR7 FHC Ca Spec ACL 4spd
1976 TR7 FHC Ca Spec 4 spd (Temp add)
1977 TR7 FHC ACW 5Spd
1978 TR8 DHC ACT FI development car 5 Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd
1981 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1327337 by Grubeguy I'm thinking of giving my TR7 to my brother instead of selling it ... Can he hook up a tow bar and pull the car back to the southwest with his truck? Assuming the TR7 is in neutral all the way and the wheel lock disengaged, would there be any damage done to the TR7's tranny?

The tranny is not splash lubricated on the 5 speed, it is oiled by a pump that is driven by the input shaft. If the transmission is in neutral, the oil pump is not turning and there is no lubrication.

When you tow the car in neutral, the gears are turning but the oil pump is not, hence the risk of breaking something.
Trailer it, disconnect the drive shaft, or tow it with the rear wheels off the ground. What you describe may well grenade the transmission.

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

cut Avatar
cut Steve Rains
Springfield, Arkansas, USA   USA
If he has trouble down in my area, Hollar and I will help.

Steve

Grubeguy Avatar
Grubeguy Grube Guy
Washington, DC, USA   USA
I appreciate the offer smiling smiley most of his journey should be across I-70. He's not yet agreed to the transfer - I should see if he's still up for it.

FrankieD Frank D'Angelo
King George, Virginia, USA   USA
So.......I wish I had read this earlier.

Several weeks ago I bought a TR7 that needed a new engine, or an engine rebuild. The thrifty side of me decided to tow the car from his place to my place ( about 150 miles), as opposed to using a car hauler service. I used a tow dolly, dragged the rear wheel and did NOT disconnect the drive shaft. As I had already lined up a replacement engine, and the car was in relatively good shape otherwise, I felt good about my purchase. Still do, but feeling a bit foolish.

What are the odds my 5 speed transmission is still serviceable? Other than driving it, how can I tell what, if any, damage is done? Or is it a forgone conclusion enough damage is probably done for me to line up a replacement tranny?

Fun times
-Frank

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
nick Avatar
nick nick m
Bend, OR, USA   USA
Run it and see what happens. What have you got to lose?



nick

TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
If he swaps the engine and runs it and the tranny is junk, he is going to have to pull it out again. Pulling the tranny on a 7 sucks big time. There is no room to get your hands back there to remove the bell housing bolts, plus there are so many sharp edges back there that its like trying to work inside a drawer full of filet knives with your eyes closed. Decent TR7 body shell, bad engine, potential junk tranny... can anybody guess what I'm thinking???

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
FrankieD Frank D'Angelo
King George, Virginia, USA   USA
TR7-V8!

I thought about it, but I do have a great engine lined up for it. Rebuilt brit spec 2.0ltr, from Terry Hurrell, Triumph Tune. Brit spec pistions, port/polished STGE II head, and a fast road cam. Probably 125 hp or more. Enough for what I want to do, with no cutting of the engine bay, or other costly mod's.

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
Frank,

Why don't you drain the tranny oil and take a good look at it. It should give you a good indication of the condition of the tranny.

FrankieD Frank D'Angelo
King George, Virginia, USA   USA
Yes Sir....I'm away on business but as soon as I get back I'll do that. I think some of the components that could be damaged are brass?

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, california, USA   USA
As I recall I believe the syncro rings are brass, however they may not be damaged during a tow since the only time they go metal to metal is during the shifting process, which wouldn't really be happening during a tow.

navydiver Rob Cornick
san diego, california, USA   USA
1975 Triumph TR7 "The Pumpkin"
1977 Triumph TR7
1978 Triumph TR8
1980 Triumph TR7 "The Plum"    & more
I'm wondering if anyone has actually cooked the bearings towing or if this is just folklore? I know the recommendation in the owners manual says to disconnect the prop shaft, but was this like many of the design features of these cars, just the engineers being careful to avoid warranty claims? I'm sure that even over a 100 miles at towing speeds the gearbox would take the "punishment" but would love to hear from anyone who can prove to the contrary. My ACT FIDHC TR8 still has the temp senders on the drain plug in the gearbox and the axle used by the the factory for testing (this was the Prototype FI test mule used for hot and cold weather testing). Maybe I should just tow one to destruction to find out!!



1975 TR7 FHC Ca Spec ACL 4spd
1976 TR7 FHC Ca Spec 4 spd (Temp add)
1977 TR7 FHC ACW 5Spd
1978 TR8 DHC ACT FI development car 5 Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd
1981 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1412619 by navydiver I'm wondering if anyone has actually cooked the bearings towing or if this is just folklore? I know the recommendation in the owners manual says to disconnect the prop shaft, but was this like many of the design features of these cars, just the engineers being careful to avoid warranty claims? I'm sure that even over a 100 miles at towing speeds the gearbox would take the "punishment" but would love to hear from anyone who can prove to the contrary. My ACT FIDHC TR8 still has the temp senders on the drain plug in the gearbox and the axle used by the the factory for testing (this was the Prototype FI test mule used for hot and cold weather testing). Maybe I should just tow one to destruction to find out!!

Rob:

You raise a good point. The lubrication of the 5 speed is via an oil pump that is driven off the input shaft of the transmission (at least, that is my understanding). So, with the transmission in neutral and the car being towed with its rear wheels on the ground, the oil pump is inoperative. Some points come to mind:
1. There is no "load" on the transmission. I.e. there is no side thrust on the gears due to engine torque being transmitted through the 'box. So the everything is operating at zero load.
2. There is still plenty of 'splash' lubrication taking place, and...
3. Every gearbox prior to the 5 speed used splash lubrication of the gears and bearings, whether under load or not. They seemed to last a reasonable amount of time without positive lubrication.

So unless the bearings and gears are of a sealed design (with check valves to let lubrication from the pump out) they are gonna get lubricated no matter what. Yeah, the lubrication will not be forced, but neither are the gears under load when they will need the most lubrication.

I think I am on your side of the fence; While disconnecting the drive shaft is the safest thing to do, I don't think anyone's transmission will grenade itself because it got towed with the driveshaft still in place.

I suppose if the fluid level in the transmission were so low that splash lubrication could not take place, then evil things would happen. At that point an operating pump could still draw oil from a sump, and the transmission would still survive. But if you let your transmission fluid get that low, you deserve to have your gearbox detonate. eye popping smiley

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster