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Original Clock

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mrkenmgb Avatar
mrkenmgb Ken DeLEEUW
Ormond Beach, Florida, USA   USA
1996 MG MGF "Green Machine"
While reading the post about the fuel gage, someone mentioned the clock. Does anyone have a clock in their car that works? All the 7's or 8's, I see at Shows, I notice the clock's don't work. I assume at one time they did. And is there a fix.
Ken

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slickfix Avatar
slickfix Greg G
Osseo, Minnesota, USA   USA
I had a 1980 TR8 a few years back. The clock worked 95 percent of the time. When it didn't, disconnecting the battery cable and tapping it on the battery post was all it took to start it again.

Greg G.
Osseo, MN

18593210 Avatar
18593210 Silver Member Wilbur Cook
Austin, TX, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB V6 Conversion
1980 Triumph TR8 "BLUE GOOSE"
1981 Triumph TR8 "CHESTER"
Mine still works and so does my sons TR8. Do a search there is a lot of info on how to get your clock to work. The wedge owners posts have some info . Try a google search also. Some people have re set their clock by disconnect a post on the battery. I think it has to do with where the TR8 lived most of it life. the dry areas being the best. There is a guy who rebuilds clocks you would have to do a search for his info.

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
Most of the ones I've had worked.

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1243062 by mrkenmgb While reading the post about the fuel gage, someone mentioned the clock. Does anyone have a clock in their car that works? All the 7's or 8's, I see at Shows, I notice the clock's don't work. I assume at one time they did. Is there a fix?
Ken

Ken:

My experience matches yours, most do not work. There is a very elaborate write up on the Wedge Owners site about how to add some resistors and whatnot to make the clock work. It is very elaborate and requires some skill with a soldering iron.

When I had my TR7 coupe, the clock was dead. I went to wrecking yards and pulled used clocks, and they would stop working almost immediately. I finally realized what was going on, and never had another problem.

Our clocks are electromechanical, not quartz. Inside the clock is a tiny spring loaded counterbalanced pendulum (not a balance wheel). It looks like a tiny dumbbell with a pair of bearings in the middle on which the pendulum pivots.

There is a tiny magnetic pick up near the pendulum, and every time it moves past the pick up, the signal gets amplified and a pulse goes to a tiny electromagnet that tugs on the pendulum so that it gets a little "shove" to keep it oscillating back and forth. The pulse is just enough to keep the pendulum oscillating.

What I discovered is that there must be some lubrication on the bearings, or friction will slowly drag the pendulum to a halt. The cure is simple - pull the clock out of the instrument panel and place a SMALL drop of sewing machine oil on each pivot/bearing. Reassemble and voila! Your clock is now running reliably. You will need a needle tip on the oil dispenser, as space is very tight inside the clock.

I think the oil from the factory (if there ever was any) dries out after 35 years, and the clocks just grind to a halt. Nothing broken, rather just an increase in friction such that the clock cannot overcome the increased drag. BTW the clock may take 15 seconds or so to start once power is applied. After I lubed my clock I hooked it to 12 volts to see if it was working. That little pendulum just barely wiggled at first, but after a few seconds it moved more, and then more, until it was finally swinging back and forth strongly - and it was not until the motion was very strong that the hands on the clock began to move. So for about 10 seconds or so I thought that it was not going to work.

Our cars are 35 years old, and lots of little things and some big things rust/dry out/rot such that they need some TLC if they are be useful. The clock is one of those things.

Cheers,

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

ozkippy Michael Kip
Emerald, Victoria, Australia   AUS
1976 Triumph Stag "Staglet"
1978 Triumph TR7 "Yellow Wedge"
1979 Triumph TR7
Vance,
I thought I would take out and have a look at this clock we have been discussing on this and another thread. I was having trouble getting my head around it as its just the way my gray matter works I think.
Referring to attached photos.
1/ Dash from behind showing the printed circuit in blue. Fuel gauge top left and clock top right The bulb holders for dash Illumination are the small rectangular black plastic fittings.

2/ Close up of the back of the clock with the small screws to the printed circuit and time adjust drive removed. Screws are to power and earth on the printed circuit which shows clearly.

3/ Front of the clock with strange attaching screws. A small blade screw driver can just undo them or you may need to cut a V in the middle of the driver to undo the screw. I think that is what Todd referred to in another thread but I could be mistaken. Why they have to have so many weird fittings give me the irritable attitude.spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

4/ Close up of the clock internals. Below the wiring section is a roughly square metal piece with a small hole. That is the pendulum. When power is put to the clock terminals that pendulum start to swing gently till it reaches full swing to activate the clock to work. In my testing sometimes the pendulum is still even with power attached but removing and then reattaching the power kick started the clock into action. Again someone mentioned that in previously as a remedy for their car.
All really simple except now to try to get it back together and working smileys with beer


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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1243458 by ozkippy
3/ Front of the clock with strange attaching screws. A small blade screw driver can just undo them or you may need to cut a V in the middle of the driver to undo the screw. I think that is what Todd referred to in another thread but I could be mistaken. Why they have to have so many weird fittings give me the irritable attitude.spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

I have always used a socket driver on them, and they come out very neatly. I thought this is what everyone was using. Can't remember off hand, but I think they are metric like most fasteners on the car. Seems like a 6mm or similar would be the right size. Anyway, use a socket driver - its what works for me...

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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TeeR8 Avatar
TeeR8 Gold Member Henri Lefebvre
Calgary, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Michael,

Based on your photo #3, we cannot blame Lucas or British engineering for the clock, the photo shows "Made in France".

Vance,

Thank you for the details on oiling the clock movement; now I can add this to my lists of Winter projects.



Henri
1980 TR8, Platinum
1971 MGB GT, Midnight Blue

TR3barton Avatar
TR3barton John Taylor
Greenfield, MA, USA   USA
I have two dead clocks and one is of of the car.

I will have it apart in an hour.

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TR3barton Avatar
TR3barton John Taylor
Greenfield, MA, USA   USA
Listers,

I have a 140mph dash from a TR7. A 140mph TR7?

In any event it had a dead clock.

I removed it, oiled it, and put it back. Let it restart. I did NOT immediately restart ...like 10sec wait. I tried it at every step and it is now back in the 140MPH dash working.

Next I will do my 8FHC.

.........and so it goes......... ;-))

motor safely

John

mrkenmgb Avatar
mrkenmgb Ken DeLEEUW
Ormond Beach, Florida, USA   USA
1996 MG MGF "Green Machine"
I was out of town this past week, and what Vance said, is the first thing I'll do this week.
Ken

StevenH Avatar
StevenH Steven Howitt
Seekonk, MA, USA   USA
Mine does work when the car's battery is connected, but then again, I only just turned 6000 original miles on my 1980 TR8 convertible. Back in storage for the winter.

Huckleberry Avatar
Huckleberry Tom B.
Laytonsville, Maryland, USA   USA
I did some work in the TR8's dash and gauge cluster last week. With the help of several wedge-owning friends. we replaced the dash lights with LED's (BIG difference) and also addressed the perennially dead clock. One of my friends (thanks, Paul E.) suggested that the problem he found with the clock is in the nature of the electrical contacts. The positive contact is a nice solid spade lug, however the negative connection is achieved through a threaded rod that bears against a sort of spring clip. Vibration can loosen the pressure of the spring clip (which was none too firm in the first place), so his fix is to force a piece of a spade lug connector into the clip to increase the pressure. That's what we did, and the clock's been ticking steadily ever since. I am not having any success posting pics of this, but you can see the clips in the IMG_20141031_095025_683[1].jpg pic shown in one of the posts above. We inserted the spade lug into the side shown in the pic.

Tom

jkosturik John Kosturik
Dawsonville, Georgia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1243422 by Darth V8R
In reply to # 1243062 by mrkenmgb While reading the post about the fuel gage, someone mentioned the clock. Does anyone have a clock in their car that works? All the 7's or 8's, I see at Shows, I notice the clock's don't work. I assume at one time they did. Is there a fix?
Ken

Ken:

My experience matches yours, most do not work. There is a very elaborate write up on the Wedge Owners site about how to add some resistors and whatnot to make the clock work. It is very elaborate and requires some skill with a soldering iron.

When I had my TR7 coupe, the clock was dead. I went to wrecking yards and pulled used clocks, and they would stop working almost immediately. I finally realized what was going on, and never had another problem.

Our clocks are electromechanical, not quartz. Inside the clock is a tiny spring loaded counterbalanced pendulum (not a balance wheel). It looks like a tiny dumbbell with a pair of bearings in the middle on which the pendulum pivots.

There is a tiny magnetic pick up near the pendulum, and every time it moves past the pick up, the signal gets amplified and a pulse goes to a tiny electromagnet that tugs on the pendulum so that it gets a little "shove" to keep it oscillating back and forth. The pulse is just enough to keep the pendulum oscillating.

What I discovered is that there must be some lubrication on the bearings, or friction will slowly drag the pendulum to a halt. The cure is simple - pull the clock out of the instrument panel and place a SMALL drop of sewing machine oil on each pivot/bearing. Reassemble and voila! Your clock is now running reliably. You will need a needle tip on the oil dispenser, as space is very tight inside the clock.

I think the oil from the factory (if there ever was any) dries out after 35 years, and the clocks just grind to a halt. Nothing broken, rather just an increase in friction such that the clock cannot overcome the increased drag. BTW the clock may take 15 seconds or so to start once power is applied. After I lubed my clock I hooked it to 12 volts to see if it was working. That little pendulum just barely wiggled at first, but after a few seconds it moved more, and then more, until it was finally swinging back and forth strongly - and it was not until the motion was very strong that the hands on the clock began to move. So for about 10 seconds or so I thought that it was not going to work.

Our cars are 35 years old, and lots of little things and some big things rust/dry out/rot such that they need some TLC if they are be useful. The clock is one of those things.

Cheers,

Vance

Vance,

I really had a hard time getting those funny screws out. I spent a lot of time researching what type of screw head they are so I could seek a tool to remove them. I saw your suggestion to use a 6mm socket and that worked fine.

I replaced all bulbs and converted to LED. I replaced the tachometer. My low fuel light has not been working and I found the ground not connected. I removed the clock and am waiting for clock oil to complete fix.

QUESTION: I had a question on how did you hook up a battery to the clock to see if it works and what type of battery?

Thanks John

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, Oregon, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1492450 by jkosturik
Vance,

I really had a hard time getting those funny screws out. I spent a lot of time researching what type of screw head they are so I could seek a tool to remove them. I saw your suggestion to use a 6mm socket and that worked fine.

I replaced all bulbs and converted to LED. I replaced the tachometer. My low fuel light has not been working and I found the ground not connected. I removed the clock and am waiting for clock oil to complete fix.

QUESTION: I had a question on how did you hook up a battery to the clock to see if it works and what type of battery?

Thanks John

John:

I used a battery charger, but a 9v battery will suffice. The metal shell of the clock is the negative terminal, the insulated spade lug protruding from the back is the positive terminal.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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