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Windshield Frame Removal

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Windshield Frame Removal
#1
  This topic is about my 1968 Triumph TR250
MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
Hi folks..... So tell me it isn't so. It looks like I need to lift off the windshield to replace the crashpad? This is probably why the PO gave me a new crashpad uninstalled.

Any tips for doing this quickly and not breaking the windshield? The whole dash is already out.....

thanks


Andrew



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-19 05:22 PM by MonAndrew77.

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gfe05111952 Avatar
gfe05111952 George Earwaker
Falls Church, Virginia, USA   USA
Andrew, I may be mistaken, but I think you can remove the windshield frame (along with the windshield). No need to separate the windshield from it's frame. This is possible for the Spitfire models, I think it may be true for the TR250 as well. Have you consulted your manual?



George
1967 Triumph GT6
1967 Triumph Spitfire4 Mk2
1968 Triumph Spitfire Mk3



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-19 05:26 AM by gfe05111952.

Reddragon Avatar
Reddragon Dale M
Chesapeake, Virginia, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4 "Road Runner"
1974 Triumph TR6 "Tweety"
Andrew

On the "A" post under the dash you should be able to see where the posts of the windshield are bolted in place. The pegs have a nut on the end of the posted. Loosen the nut to the end of the peg. After applying WD 40 or similar type of lubricant to the peg and the bracket, use a mallet to break lose the seal that the pegs will have on the bracket. Lightly rocking the entire windshield frame front to back and then hitting the pegs with the mallet till you can bring it up to the nuts on the pegs. In some cases, once you get it up, you may have to use a putty knife to separate the dash pad from the bottom of the windshield. It is best to have an assistant to help to remove the windshield as it is tough to remove by oneself.

Good luck and patience are the keywords. Dale

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Desert TR Avatar
Desert TR Gold Member Jim P
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Andrew,

Dale is on the right track, but missed a couple things. In order to get the post out of the "A" post brackets, you must first loosen the two upper bolts on the bracket from the outside. (see Photo 1) The bracket holds the windshield frame posts in two ways. The upper part of the post is clamped by the bracket (hence the two upper bolts) while the nyloc nut is screwed onto the threads at the bottom of the post. In addition to the "A" post brackets, there are three bolts along the dash that have to be removed. (Photo 2) You can then use flat screw drivers, wedges etc. to pull the frame and glass up a little at a time while lifting and rocking it. Some times this is easy, others not so much. (Photo 3) I was able to do it by myself, but a friend to help would have been nice.
I recommend you plan on replacing the seal between the windshield frame and the body as it will probably not come off in good shape. The new dash pad may have to be trimmed so the forward edge goes under the seal, but not past it. The pad is held in place by the pressure of the windshield frame and seal, the bolts that hold the metal dash in place (5), the demister vents and the three windshield frame bolts. In addition, contact cement should be applied to the forward edge to help hold it in place and seal it to the body. The cement is only applied to the edge where there is no foam padding (maybe 1 - 1 1/2 inches). You can use the 8 bolts and the demister vents to hole everything in place while the cement is applied and sets up. (Photo 4) If you have any other questions, let me know.

Jim


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MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
So we're all in agreement to change the dash pad you must lift the windshield frame?

The Bentley manual describes the removal like it's a walk in the park. I think I have a pretty good idea how to remove the frame, I just wish I didn't have to do it. I know I'm gonna get in there and something is gonna be seized or I will have to buy some specialized wrench. smiling smiley

MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
By the way, I meant to say in my last post "given your advice, I think I have a good idea on how to remove the frame...."

Ugh. I'm dreading this. sad smiley

MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
Success! Thanks to all your advice and some ace tips from my buddy Mark, I got it off with ease. I pretty much just followed the Bentley guide... I took out the three bolts across the top and the two nuts on the post-ends. Then I loosened the four bracket bolts (from the outside) just a bit and saturated the posts with PB Blaster. I worked with it little by little every 45 minutes all afternoon each time slowly rocking it front to back while standing in the car straddling the transmission. (Easy with no seats, granted.) Gradually it started to move. I helped it a bit with some wood shims and had my wife come out and watch the posts to see if it was really moving. She was amazed it worked! smiling smiley

Anyways, thanks to Bentley, Mark and you guys, this wasn't too big of a deal. Putting it back on should be easy enough. Plus it will be helpful to know how to "adjust" it slightly when fitting the Surrey-top roof section (which up to now didn't fit fully in place.)

Andrew

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gfe05111952 Avatar
gfe05111952 George Earwaker
Falls Church, Virginia, USA   USA
Nice work, Andrew. I'm pleased it wasn't as big a deal as you were expecting.



George
1967 Triumph GT6
1967 Triumph Spitfire4 Mk2
1968 Triumph Spitfire Mk3

MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
OK. Ready to attach the crash pad and replace the windshield. What spray contact cement is going to lock this thing down like a steel trap? I've been told to "check with the automotive store for a recommendation" but does anyone have any experience on this? I don't want the usual stuff you use for the rest of the trim. I want the strongest there is because my pad is going to be baking in the hot Virginia sun much of the time!

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Desert TR Avatar
Desert TR Gold Member Jim P
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Andrew,

A common misunderstanding is that the cement holds the dash pad in place. The pad is held by the windshield frame seal, the three frame bolts and the five screws attaching the metal dash to the cowl with the edge of the pad clamped between them. The cement is only applied to the edge that goes under the frame seal to keep it from moving during assembly and providing a moisture seal. (See my post #4 this topic.) If you slather the pad with cement, it can't move and expand and contract with changes in temperature resulting in foam delamination and premature cracking. I used the three bolts and the five screws to set the position then used small wedges to lift the front edge and applied Dap contact cement. (Brush in a bottle version.) Once the contact cement set up (15 minutes) I remove the wedges and sealed it to the cowl. (Forth photo, same post.) Once the contact cement has cured, you can mount the dash and windshield, which actually clamp the pad in place.

Jim

TuRtle5 Avatar
TuRtle5 Kevin Kelly
Absecon, NJ, USA   USA
1949 Triumph 2000 Roadster "Coral Mistress"
1959 Triumph TR3A "Drandulet"
1962 Triumph Vitesse "Ohtoseethelightofday"
1968 Triumph TR250    & more
Andrew- if using DAP cement- get the non water base. Most important- ANTI-SEIZE the posts on reassembly. - Kevin

Desert TR Avatar
Desert TR Gold Member Jim P
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Andrew,

You can go blind trying to read the fine print to determine the base. Just look for the water resistant version listed on the front label. To anti-seize the post, just coat the machined section with wheel bearing grease.

Jim

MonAndrew77 Avatar
MonAndrew77 Andrew M
Northern, Virginia, USA   USA
I think I have the right DAP contact cement. It would appear to be the water resistant variety. There is no brush in the cap but.....

So I'm planning on using the DAP for the front of the crash pad per Jim P's instructions. Last chance....is DAP what I should use, or should I use consider one of these other spray adhesives I have on hand? Pretty sure they are right to left, weak to strongest. My feeling is considering that the crash pad isn't really "held" in place by the contact cement, the DAP is fine for the front of the crash pad, but just want a final verdict. smiling smiley

Also, should I also glue "up" the far sides of the crash pad where there is no bolt to hold it under the lip? (see pic with finger pointing)

Thanks everyone.....


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Desert TR Avatar
Desert TR Gold Member Jim P
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Andrew,

That is the Dap contact cement I used. It will form a stronger and higher temp bond than the sprays. I used the smaller glass bottle which has the application brush. If you are redoing the interior, hold on to the "90" as it works well on the wheel arch covers. I don't think you have to glue the edge over the vent. It's close enough to the end screw. You may want to sand and paint the metal dash while you can. Just remember the cement will "grab" (bond on contact) when the two surfaces are put in contact, so make sure the pad is correctly positioned.

Comments from other will probably make Andrew feel more at ease.

Jim

Desert TR Avatar
Desert TR Gold Member Jim P
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA   USA
Andrew,

You may want to search or even "poll" the TR4 and TR6 forums. They get more traffic and you might get differing opinions.

Jim

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