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Spitfire for racing need help

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sccaspitfire Avatar
sccaspitfire Kevin Oday
Salem, Massachusetts, USA   USA
Just picked up a 72 spitfire and plan to use for vintage racing I would like to know what alternator you guys use also radiator and fan set up.
Thank you

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sccaspitfire Avatar
sccaspitfire Kevin Oday
Salem, Massachusetts, USA   USA
Here's a photo of the car


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Spitfirejoe Avatar
Spitfirejoe Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska, USA   USA
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Phoenix"
There is a small, light Bosch alternator that is a direct plug and play on Spitfires - easy to find with a search on eBay or Google, I think.

For radiators - I think most people have been best served with a new full aluminum radiator. I see these on eBay all the time and with reasonable pricing. Some people have used radiators from a VW Scirocco. I think a lot get by with a good, clean, stock radiator.

Tell us a little more about yourself - where you are located, and a little about the history of the car. What vintage group are you joining? I'm trying to finish bringing an old SCCA Spitfire back to the track as well, and have joined the Rocky Mountain Vintage Racing club. I'm also a non-member of the non-club called Friends of Triumph. We call it a non-club because there are no formal rules, no dues, no officers, no anything except helping people to keep racing Triumphs. If you'd like, I'll nominate you to the club.



Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska

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sccaspitfire Avatar
sccaspitfire Kevin Oday
Salem, Massachusetts, USA   USA
Thanks Joe. I live just north of Boston and currently race a 72 Formula Vee in scca New England region. I plan to bring this spitfire back to F production vintage racing and some scca regional events

1964Spitfire Avatar
1964Spitfire Tim P
Santa Clara, CA, USA   USA
For an alternator I went with the Bosch ALRACE1, after recommendations from a few other racers.
Not cheap but very reliable and built for extreme conditions.

Had a mini Denso and it vibrated apart after 2 or three races.

Triumph Racer Avatar
Triumph Racer Patrick N
south bend, IN., USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4 "My First Triumph"
1962 Triumph TR4 "Big Red"
1964 Triumph TR4 "Ugly Duckling"
1971 Triumph Spitfire MkIV    & more
Hello Kevin,first thing I would do is check and see if the club you want to run with allows the car. many clubs still do not except cars of 70's vintage. You may have to run with a more National Club than regional. If you have any questions about parts or set-ups,just ask.



Sometimes you succeed,other times you learn.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1316767 by 1964Spitfire For an alternator I went with the Bosch ALRACE1, after recommendations from a few other racers.
Not cheap but very reliable and built for extreme conditions.

Had a mini Denso and it vibrated apart after 2 or three races.

What does this particular Bosch alternator bring to the party to justify it's price?

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1964Spitfire Avatar
1964Spitfire Tim P
Santa Clara, CA, USA   USA
What my friend told me - dual internal cooling fans, high quality precision bearings, balanced for up to 18000 RPMs, originally built for a spec racing series.

I couldn't find much on the net. I may have a datasheet on my other computer.

Here is what one of the vendors says:
Compact size (7 lbs.). Short track racing applications. Dual internal cooling fans, external regulator & rectifier, 17 mm shaft with single "V" groove pulley.
This alternator is not a direct fit for any application. It was designed by Bosch for spec engines and race cars. Modifications for mounting and belt/pulley configuration will be necessary.

Speedracer Avatar
Speedracer Platinum Member Hap Waldrop
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB Racecar "The Biscuit"
Kevin, That car's roll cage looks very familiar, like my first race car, those wheels are the same as well, kinda got me thinking. I sold my FP Spitfitre to guy in Wappinger Falls CT, Steven Greer, his father owned at Toyota dealership there , this would have been in late 1985.



Hap Waldrop
Acme Speed Shop
864-370-3000
www.acmespeedshop.com
Engines, Rebuild Kits and More.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-10-08 05:58 PM by Speedracer.


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Triumph Racer Avatar
Triumph Racer Patrick N
south bend, IN., USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4 "My First Triumph"
1962 Triumph TR4 "Big Red"
1964 Triumph TR4 "Ugly Duckling"
1971 Triumph Spitfire MkIV    & more
Hello Hap,I was wondering about you the other day. Have you managed to stay high & dry? Hope the storm did not mess with you too bad.
Those wheels do look fairly odd,maybe Fiat-ish? Or maybe strange enough to be from a Mercur? I have seen them before but can't remember where.



Sometimes you succeed,other times you learn.

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quikrx Ralph Hansen
Antioch, Illinois, USA   USA
1962 Triumph Herald 1200
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Gloria"
1987 Mazda RX-7 "Mistress"
2003 Toyota Celica GT-S "Natasha"    & more
Ditch the fan blade if racing, only causes serious damage if it lets go at high rpm. A Spit properly setup will not need a fan to keep it cool. Use the aluminum radiator from Ebay, multiple row, or find an early MkI, MkII Spit rad, works fine with a wild engine. Duct in whatever radiator you use tightly from the grill to radiator, no bad seams, edges close to grill opening and rad core, do not duct tanks, no benefit there. On cool days may have to partially tape grill to get engine up to 195 deg. Take a stock t/stat and pull the guts out, just use the ring. Any questions feel free to ask, raced a Spit years ago.

Ralph

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
Yeah, the fan is only needed when car is traveling less than 5-10 MPH or so, ie long periods of stop'n'go traffic.
Racecars don't do stop'n'go traffic.
An electric fan with switch in the cockpit gives you the option.

OFRacer Avatar
OFRacer Mike H
Poughkeepsie, NY, USA   USA
Hap, you mean Wappingers Falls, NY, not CT. I grew up there and bought my first new truck from Greer Toyota. I think I've saw your old car for sale, in fairly ratty shape on CL last spring. The angle on the front of the roll cage caught my eye. It was for sale in Wappingers Falls, by a guy who is a known car pack rat.

mike h

JimG Avatar
JimG Jim G
Aurora, CO, USA   USA
The compact Denso alternator has served me really well. 65.00 at parts geek I think.
This same alternator is advertised elsewhere as a lightweight/compact racing alternator for $ 230.00 +.
I had to make my own brackets. It's for the 1987-88 chevy sprint and a lot of other cars.
jim g


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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
A racecar basically just needs enough power to run the ignition and brake lights.
They also tend to idle a higher RPM than normal. but also higher than normal when being driven
This works out great, allows you fit an oversized alternator pulley.
Let's the alternator run at reduced RPM, which not only makes it last a long time, but also free's up HP so that you can go faster!

On a stock regular car, assume the normal idle is 750 RPM, cruise at 2500 RPM, redline at 6,000 RPM
Due to small pulley sizes, the alternator is idling at 1500 RPM, cruising at 5,000 RPM, and redlining at 12,000 RPM!
This is done to ensure that the battery is always fully charged for lights, A/C, etc.
A racecar idles at 1200 RPM, cruises at 5,000, redlines at 8,000 RPM
Double the pulley size and racecar idles at 1200 RPM, cruises at 5,000, and redlines at 8,000.

Same applies to water pumps.
At some RPM a normal water pump will cavitate and quickly lose effectiveness
Slow it down a bit, and gain better cooling, plus free up more HP to make the car go fast!

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