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How much HP & torque from a TR6 motor?

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esmith Ed Smith
Knoxville, Tenn, USA   USA
I recently looked back over some posts addressing HP and torque from our TR6 motors. In the next few weeks a fellow club member and I are going to make some dyno pulls. This should give some more insight with data to back it up. His car is a '74 with a fresh stock spec motor with the exception of forged pistons. He has one of the older supercharger kits which uses a 2in SU carb. Mine is a '72. My engine has the more traditional modifications. The block is bored .030 and has cam bearings, CP Carillo 10 to 1cr forged pistons, Carillo rods, an APT big valve head with 1.55 roller rockers and an APT .270 lift cam. It is all held together with ARP head and main studs. The fly wheel was cut 5lbs, the crank is10/10 and the assembly was balanced. I have a Wizzard aluminum radiator with an electric fan and a thermostatically controlled oil cooler. I traded for the header and have no idea the mfgr, it is 2x3 into 2 with a Monza exhaust. The transmission is a w58 Toytota with Herman's adapter kit. When I ordered the kit,Herman suggested a heavy duty clutch because of the engine mods which I bought with the kit. I am using [2] 46 mm Hitchi carburetors from Paltech, they are off of a 71 240z and are a copy of an SU. They flow 10 percent more than 1-3/4 SU's according to Paltech. I am using a Petronix ignition with the Petronix coil, set at stock timing. I own a an 03 JCW Mini Cooper S which is rated at 210 HP and weighs about the same as my TR6, the seat of the pants feel sez the are comparable in performance. It will be interesting to see what the dyno pulls tell.

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poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
Wire wheel guy Jim Smith
Baton Rouge, LA, USA   USA
I see you have air conditioning. Tell us what you did.
Thanks,
Jim

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esmith Ed Smith
Knoxville, Tenn, USA   USA
Jim,
The AC unit was a thank you to my wife who enjoys the nice cool morning trips; however, as we all know, the return trip can turn into an inferno. I started out with a RetroAir kit. When I began to examine the parts I found them well made, but in my opinion the design was poor. They used two head bolts to secure the compressor to the engine...not good. There was no belt tensioner; they used the alternator to keep the belt tight, again not good. The unit was cooling only and quite bulky, completely eliminating the glove box. Here in Knoxville we have a well stocked rod shop, Performance Products. They are a VintageAir dealer, and as we began to build the unit they had what we needed. First, a mounting bracket was made to attach the compressor to the motor like the factory unit. Another bracket was made to mount the alternator and the belt tensioner, all of this using existing mounting holes on the front of the motor. Next brackets were welded on the front of the radiator for the condenser. A VintageAir under dash unit was secured. It is both a heat and AC unit combined and does not completely eliminate the glove box, only about half. A 12-volt diverter valve was used to control the hot water flow, and a custom control panel was put together. I have posted pictures of the control panel and the diverter valve. The car was rewired using a Advance Auto wiring kit. I had them build in a circuit for the AC unit. The radio was replaced with a vent that blows either hot or cold air, which ever you want. Getting the pulleys aligned was a bit fiddly and time consuming. The work was done by my friend Richard Lockhart in his English Auto shop with a little help from me as parts chaser. The system works well and looks good too. The only job left is to mount a solenoid switch to up the rpm when the AC compressor switches on. Holly makes one with a mounting bracket so this should be a straight forward install. The little chrome button to the right is my starter button, a little help with the bad key placement.


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Wire wheel guy Jim Smith
Baton Rouge, LA, USA   USA
Thanks Ed! I am in the process of doing just about the same thing in my frame off restoration of a 1972.
I had posted a plea on the forum about a year ago asking about others with experience with modern a/c, but did not get a response. I know most feel that the correct a/c system for the Tr6 is to put the top down, but they have not experienced it in the south in August.
I ended up ordering my unit from Nostalgic air in Florida. They modified their MGB system to accommodate the TR6 space.
I, too, am going to use the heat and air feature and actually removed the heater so I would have more room for the unit.
I am ordering Rick Patton’s fuel injection system today, which will solve the idle problem I am told.
I will do a full write-upon my installation for the forum when I finally get it finished.
Jim

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