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My engine rebuild, step 297...

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I think I suffer from a classic case of making a problem where one does not exist. That is... there's nothing wrong with the oil delivery to the rockers. I'm convinced of this by the oil dripping off the rocker arms on 4, 5, 6. But what about all that carbon buildup on 1,2,3?
Well, as my brother pointed out (from 2000 miles away) all that carbon is near the rocker cover breather hole, which is connected to my 40 year old carbon canister. Well, I intended to replace it eventually. I hit the valve springs with compressed air and I sent such an incredible plum of carbon dust into the air.

But, I still have some issues to resolve. I need a new carbon canister. I need to re-gap the valves now, and again after some more break in.

Lastly, I need to fix my starter which decided to stop engaging the flywheel. Dang. Not sure what happened there but when I turn the key I hear the starter spin free without turning the motor.

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
I don't see 'that screw' either, plus it looks like some metal particles near the valve springs in the center of your picture....that may have some relation to what Tony pointed out.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1497551 by Tonyfixit That valve gap seems very excessive, plus is the circled area an indication of rocker or rocker shaft wear?

The valve gap is so bad, I'm convinced my engine guy never gaped them after assembly. I'll take a closer look at that gap between the rocker arm and the shaft. I don't think there is a problem there, but I might be wrong. The shaft and rocker arms are all original.

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
I'm intrigued by your brothers observation....what's the theory there, that some of the carbon from the carbon canister got sucked into the valve cover ???

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1497562 by poolboy I'm intrigued by your brothers observation....what's the theory there, that some of the carbon from the carbon canister got sucked into the valve cover ???

That's the theory. It's hard to imagine because it implies gasses traveling backwards in the system (as I understand it). The rocker cover should be under positive pressure if there is any blowby from the cylinders. These gasses should travel to the intake which is producing a vacuum. That's how it typically works (as I understand it).

However, it's clear to me that the gobs of carbon dust all over the springs of 1-3 came in through the rocker breather. I don't know why but there's a spray pattern inside the rocker cover around the breather hole. I don't know why. Could a stuck intake valve cause this? The engine sounds fine. I want to run the engine with the oil cap off and cover the rocker with my hand to see if it's sucking or blowing... but I first have to remove the starter and debug that problem before I can start the car (grumble).

Krom Avatar
Krom Paul K
San Rafael, CA, USA   USA
Steve- If you haven't already done so, put the Phillips head screw back in the rocker pedestal at the rear of the valve train. Make sure it properly engages the shaft. Maybe some Loctite. You're probably getting oil spurting out of the screw hole. This leaves a lack of pressure for the rest of the shaft and the #1, 2,& 3 valves are suffering as a result. If it is not already cooked, your shaft and rockers will suffer from dehydration unless you remedy this. Whichever cylinder you illustrated with the big gap, get the adjustment right or you will have problems. Ensure you have properly adjusted your valves before running your engine again. Adjust them with the engine cold. Check the manual.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Looking at those pics, everything is DRY! How did you get oil in the engine and have the valve gear so dry?

I have serious concerns about the condition of of the rocker shaft and rockers.

Before you thighten that valve gap, jiggle the rocker or move it to one side to check for wear on the shft.

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Brett E Brett Evans
Columbus, Ohio, USA   USA
1973 Triumph TR6 "Scarlet Harlot"
You do of course realize that your original rockers/shaft/springs are 41 years old? Lots of wear in that time. I replaced mine with bushed rockers on a hardened shaft with new springs, Came as a complete assembly from TRF, I'm sure other suppliers have them as well. I just thought better safe than sorry.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"


Notice my starter gear extends and stops spinning. Gah! Why is this happening?

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Is this a strobe effect from your camera?

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
No, it’s a new starter that is broken. I pulled it off the car because it stopped working. Time to replace the $150 starter with a $290 starter.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1498855 by Rex A Lott No, it’s a new starter that is broken. I pulled it off the car because it stopped working. Time to replace the $150 starter with a $290 starter.

How do you get that?

I can see going for a gear reduction starter over an iffy aftermarket Lucas. If you did not with to go hands on making an adaptor plate, or just fix what you have (if it is woth fixing) You could also buy a ready made conversion. https://www.bpnorthwest.com/triumph/tr250-tr6/engine-electrical/starter-gear-reduction-tr6.html

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1498869 by Tonyfixit ...You could also buy a ready made conversion. https://www.bpnorthwest.com/triumph/tr250-tr6/engine-electrical/starter-gear-reduction-tr6.html

This is the same starter that just quit working. An after market "hi torque" type. It started the car successfully about 20 times. I'll take this thing apart to see if there's a fix. Despite being lightly used, this starter is 2 years old. I doubt there's a cost effective fix.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
OK, I see that now.

The starter is engaging but I suspect the pre engage starter solenoid is not making good contact, or the contacts are bent or worn.

Check this out. New conacts are available from your FLAPS foe about $3 each.


Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Parts on order:
Rocker screw
Carbon cannister
starter

I took the bad starter apart and determined that the Sprague Clutch failed. I'm out of warrenty. I sent an email to BritishStarters.com asking them if they can source me a new clutch for their starter. Meanwhile, I've ordered another starter from BPN. I'm probably going to receive the exact same starter model that failed.
Bah humbug grumble grumble.

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