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My engine rebuild, step 297...

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My engine rebuild, step 297...
#1
  This topic is about my 1976 Triumph TR6
Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I've been spinning off threads on various topics for a while. I've decided to start my own thread. Everyone here has been so helpful so far. I'll just post my questions here until the six is finally able to be driven.

About me:
I have a '76. Engine was shaved, bored, and now sports a GP2 cam. I've been literally installing the engine for years now. Progress is slow as life keeps getting in the way of my rebuild. Two kids and a new job that is very challenging. Add to that... I don't really know what I'm doing. I've never rebuilt a car. I do have a penchant to build and fix things. I'm the proud owner of an Apple iPhone 6... which I've disassembled twice now. I build my own computers (over 20 years now). and so on.

Build status:
The engine machine work was done professionally. I received an engine that was "top end and bottom end complete". I did the work to reconnect the trans. I installed it back into the car. The last 12 months have been tinkering in the garage on engine projects. The result of which includes rebuild of both carbs. Rebuilt radiator with electric fan and temp sensor switch is installed. Hoses and vaccuum lines installed and we are ready to test fire! Woot!

Stuff happens #1
Shot starter fluid in the carb. Turned the key. Bang! A night of beer and head scratching, internet searching, and manual reading revealed what many experienced sixxers could have guessed. The distributor drive dog was 180 degrees out of rotation. If you don't know what a drive dog is, consider yourself lucky.

Stuff happens #2
With the engine start successful on starter fluid, I completed radiator install, all coolant lines, fuel lines. I put 8 gal of gas in the tank (what WAS I thinking?). I had 'cleaned' my fuel pump over a year ago, but I did not rebuild it because meh... what could go wrong!? The fuel pump leaked. Fuel pump removal was really challenging and by the time we finished removing the fuel pump, distributor, coil, I had dumped about a gallon of fuel on the floor of the garage. The entire house smelled like gas. Not a happy day. Eventually I got the fuel tank drained, the floor cleaned, and the house aired out. A week later it took me about 2 hours to rebuild the fuel pump with the handy kit from TRF.

Stuff happens #3
With a rebuilt fuel pump in hand and a fresh six pack of beer and 2 weeks advance scheduling with the family, my buddy and I embarked on the next engine start attempt. Everything reinstalled for the 'umteenth' time. We prime the fuel pump by hand... this time with only 2 gallons of gas in the tank (see, I can learn!). There was a sort of funny moment as my buddy and I went around the engine bay groping and feeling for wet spots in case there was another fuel leak. All seemed in order so we started the engine. This was a little loud since I have headers but not exhaust at this time. We ran the engine on gas until it smoothed out... maybe 30 seconds. It was a happy moment as it was clear that the rebuilt carbs were working! The rebuild fuel pump was working! The rebuilt distributor was working! Hey everybody... I did a thing and it's working. Shut off the engine and the silence was deafening for a second. Then we both started to notice a dripping noise. Under the car was 2-3 quarts of 20W-50 spreading out like caramel colored pancake batter on the floor under the engine!

To the right of the fuel pump in the block is a tap into an oil 'journal' or channel that runs high pressure oil up to the valves. The tap is part of the stock engine. I pulled the 'thingy' out of the tap and much head scratching followed as we determined the hollow-bolt-doohicky that we removed from the hole was 10mm bolt size with 1mm thread pitch. How did a metric doohicky end up in the engine block? This wasn't a bolt but rather it was some connector intended to connect an oil line to a tap on an engine. Oil could pass right through the hollow center of this thing that was really a threaded pipe. The light bulb came one when I said out loud "it's metric but it looks like it belongs in there because it's even the same color as the block." I realized my engine builder shoved this doohicky into the oil tap just before he painted the block in order to prevent paint from entering the tap. In fact... I think I remember him saying something to me about it, you know... two years ago. <sigh>



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-30 12:08 PM by Rex A Lott.

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Questions:

I know people have installed an extra oil line here to deliver oil to some part of the valve train known to run a little dry. It's worth noting that this system connects at the oil pressure sensor. That's a different location. The plug I'm talking about lives to the right of the fuel pump, while the oil pressure sensor is on the left.

What is the stock configuration for this oil plug? Is there typically a bolt in there? We test fit a bolt that fit perfectly in the hole. I want to be careful not to install a bolt that would block oil flow. The bolt we had in hand was way too long and it stopped turning about 1/4-1/2" into the block. Is there a risk that a "too long" bolt would sit in the oil channel and restrict the flow of oil to the valves? Is this a special part that goes in here?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-30 12:27 PM by Rex A Lott.

ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
In reply to # 1489068 by Rex A Lott Questions:

I know people have installed an extra oil line here to deliver oil to some part of the valve train known to run a little dry. It's worth noting that this system connects at the oil pressure sensor. That's a different location. The plug I'm talking about lives to the right of the fuel pump, while the oil pressure sensor is on the left.

What is the stock configuration for this oil plug? Is there typically a bolt in there? We test fit a bolt that fit perfectly in the hole. I want to be careful not to install a bolt that would block oil flow. The bolt we had in hand was way too long and it stopped turning about 1/4-1/2" into the block. Is there a risk that a "too long" bolt would sit in the oil channel and restrict the flow of oil to the valves? Is this a special part that goes in here?

It would be a threaded plug, not a bolt...Use some teflon tape or PTFE sealant on the threads...
Scott

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tr6bobnf Avatar
tr6bobnf Bob Evans
Paradise, Newfoundland, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1489061 by Rex A Lott I've been spinning off threads on various topics for a while. I've decided to start my own thread. Everyone here has been so helpful so far. I'll just post my questions here until the six is finally able to be driven.

About me:
I have a '76. Engine was shaved, bored, and now sports a GP2 cam. I've been literally installing the engine for years now. Progress is slow as life keeps getting in the way of my rebuild. Two kids and a new job that is very challenging. Add to that... I don't really know what I'm doing. I've never rebuilt a car. I do have a penchant to build and fix things. I'm the proud owner of an Apple iPhone 6... which I've disassembled twice now. I build my own computers (over 20 years now). and so on.

Build status:
The engine machine work was done professionally. I received an engine that was "top end and bottom end complete". I did the work to reconnect the trans. I installed it back into the car. The last 12 months have been tinkering in the garage on engine projects. The result of which includes rebuild of both carbs. Rebuilt radiator with electric fan and temp sensor switch is installed. Hoses and vaccuum lines installed and we are ready to test fire! Woot!

Stuff happens #1
Shot starter fluid in the carb. Turned the key. Bang! A night of beer and head scratching, internet searching, and manual reading revealed what many experienced sixxers could have guessed. The distributor drive dog was 180 degrees out of rotation. If you don't know what a drive dog is, consider yourself lucky.

Stuff happens #2


With the engine start successful on starter fluid, I completed radiator install, all coolant lines, fuel lines. I put 8 gal of gas in the tank (what WAS I thinking?). I had 'cleaned' my fuel pump over a year ago, but I did not rebuild it because meh... what could go wrong!? The fuel pump leaked. Fuel pump removal was really challenging and by the time we finished removing the fuel pump, distributor, coil, I had dumped about a gallon of fuel on the floor of the garage. The entire house smelled like gas. Not a happy day. Eventually I got the fuel tank drained, the floor cleaned, and the house aired out. A week later it took me about 2 hours to rebuild the fuel pump with the handy kit from TRF.

Stuff happens #3
With a rebuilt fuel pump in hand and a fresh six pack of beer and 2 weeks advance scheduling with the family, my buddy and I embarked on the next engine start attempt. Everything reinstalled for the 'umteenth' time. We prime the fuel pump by hand... this time with only 2 gallons of gas in the tank (see, I can learn!). There was a sort of funny moment as my buddy and I went around the engine bay groping and feeling for wet spots in case there was another fuel leak. All seemed in order so we started the engine. This was a little loud since I have headers but not exhaust at this time. We ran the engine on gas until it smoothed out... maybe 30 seconds. It was a happy moment as it was clear that the rebuilt carbs were working! The rebuild fuel pump was working! The rebuilt distributor was working! Hey everybody... I did a thing and it's working. Shut off the engine and the silence was deafening for a second. Then we both started to notice a dripping noise. Under the car was 2-3 quarts of 20W-50 spreading out like caramel colored pancake batter on the floor under the engine!

To the right of the fuel pump in the block is a tap into an oil 'journal' or channel that runs high pressure oil up to the valves. The tap is part of the stock engine. I pulled the 'thingy' out of the tap and much head scratching followed as we determined the hollow-bolt-doohicky that we removed from the hole was 10mm bolt size with 1mm thread pitch. How did a metric doohicky end up in the engine block? This wasn't a bolt but rather it was some connector intended to connect an oil line to a tap on an engine. Oil could pass right through the hollow center of this thing that was really a threaded pipe. The light bulb came one when I said out loud "it's metric but it looks like it belongs in there because it's even the same color as the block." I realized my engine builder shoved this doohicky into the oil tap just before he painted the block in order to prevent paint from entering the tap. In fact... I think I remember him saying something to me about it, you know... two years ago. <sigh>

Geez Rex:
Your post sounds just like my experience right down to the GP2 cam, shaved head, cylinder head oil feed and dizzy out 180. Must be a TR6 thing or just us old farts getting stuff done the hard way. Sure beats NOT having a TR6 though. smileys with beer Good luck with the rest of it.
Cheers,



_________________________
Bob
1976 TR6 - CF53465U

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I found a plug, not a bolt. Problem solved... onward to the next big spill.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Next Question: Where can I procure an ANSA exhaust?

Triumphgt6er Avatar
Triumphgt6er Jim Snell
Cave Creek, Arizona, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Bubbles"
In reply to # 1489235 by Rex A Lott Next Question: Where can I procure an ANSA exhaust?

https://www.amazon.com/Ansa-TR0840-Exhaust-System-Triumph/dp/B01FE7ZKHG

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1489289 by Triumphgt6er
In reply to # 1489235 by Rex A Lott Next Question: Where can I procure an ANSA exhaust?

https://www.amazon.com/Ansa-TR0840-Exhaust-System-Triumph/dp/B01FE7ZKHG

Exhaust procured.
Engine plugged.

Upward and onward to deal with some electrical issues.


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barcalude Dave B
Baldwinsville, NY, USA   USA
Hi Rex. I'm thinking that the connection you're talking about is for the oil line that goes to the oil pressure gauge in the dash? I remember reinstalling an engine and forgetting this connection.....sure can make a mess,
Sounds like you're making steady progress, keep at it.
Dave

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1489419 by barcalude Hi Rex. I'm thinking that the connection you're talking about is for the oil line that goes to the oil pressure gauge in the dash? I remember reinstalling an engine and forgetting this connection.....sure can make a mess,
Sounds like you're making steady progress, keep at it.
Dave

Note quite. The oil pressure sensor is in place and working. This is another tap that AFIK, no one ever uses. It's plugged now.

Krom Avatar
Krom Paul K
San Rafael, CA, USA   USA
Steve- I believe Dave's comment above refers to the flexible tube/pipe that conveys oil from the block to the mechanical oil pressure gauge on the dash to read the oil pressure. In addition to that pipe/tube, you have an electrical sender that turns off the idiot light (the green light) in the tach gauge. If your tube/pipe to the oil pressure gauge is not connected to the galley to the right of the fuel pump, where is it connected? You are correct about blocking off the galleyway from the upper rear driver's side corner of the block if you are not employing an auxiliary oil feed to the head. PK

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Does my dizzy look correct?
I know the firing order is correct.

Consider clock positions where the small white ballast wire is the 12 o'clock position.
Looking at several manuals, the position of the cylinder #1 wire could go in the 5 or the 7 o'clock position.


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IMG_2257.JPG

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1489641 by Krom ... If your tube/pipe to the oil pressure gauge is not connected to the galley to the right of the fuel pump, where is it connected? PK

Oh.......... right. So my oil pressure guage tube is just dangling under the brake master cyl. Good catch Paul and Dave. I need to order an AH14 from TRF engine parts

poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
It looks to be it's in it's proper location as far as engagement with the distributor drive gear, but you might need a little more timing advance....and that white/black wire from the dizzy to the coil isn't the ballast resistor wire...it's the ground wire.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-02 07:51 PM by poolboy.

dicta dick Taylor
Downey, Callifornia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1489679 by Rex A Lott Does my dizzy look correct?
I know the firing order is correct.

Consider clock positions where the small white ballast wire is the 12 o'clock position.
Looking at several manuals, the position of the cylinder #1 wire could go in the 5 or the 7 o'clock position.

Rex --- #1 sparkplug wire can be anywhere around the clock, so long as the firing order is maintained and the points open just as the rotor is in position in the cap to fire that particular plug. (Yours looks to be about 30 minutes "slow"winking smiley
If you decide to change this it can be done by jumping the distributor drive gear one tooth clockwise (26.4 deg.)
Trying to change it by just moving the distributor body clockwise could advance the timing too much, so you'll want to know where the timing is before doing anything.

Attached is where my particular distributor cap plug wires are clocked and the rotor is right under the cap terminal when the spark is transferred.

Dick


Attachments:
Plug wire clocking.jpg    51.5 KB
Plug wire clocking.jpg

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