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Motor Grenade!!

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
We'll see.

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scardini1 Avatar
scardini1 Gold Member Jim Moscardini
Great Mills, MD, USA   USA
1968 Triumph GT6 "Rocinante"
2003 Jaguar XKR "Kitty"
In reply to # 1488386 by Tote Nothing JB Weld can't fix!

THAT'S THE SPIRIT! spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

glcaines Avatar
glcaines Silver Member Gary Caines
Hiawassee, Georgia, USA   USA
It's easy to assume the worst. Determine what the problem is and fix it. It doesn't sound too bad to me. In fact it sounds like a blessing that the engine quit running. The engine is obviously not locked up if it turned over and not grenaded. I would start as follows. Clean the engine off. Put oil in the engine. Disconnect the ignition to prevent starting. Turn the engine over via the starter and look to see where the oil is coming from, especially the pressure sender unit, filter, etc. If there is no oil pressure, stop immediately. If you don't see a leak, start the engine and look for a leak. If the engine won't start, find out why and repair and then look for a leak with the engine running. If the engine runs and there is no oil pressure, stop immediately.



Current: 1973 TR6 W/Overdrive

Previous:
1963 TR3B W/Overdrive
1962 TR3A
1961 TR3A
1960 TR3A
1960 TR3A

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, Washington, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
If you do pull the oil pan off then search the oil for metal particulate. If you don't find any, you are probably in good shape. Next, push and pull on the main shaft and the crank arms. If you can get any of them to wiggle, you have a bad main shaft bearing.

glcaines Avatar
glcaines Silver Member Gary Caines
Hiawassee, Georgia, USA   USA
If you are pulling the oil pan, I would recommend checking the crankshaft end play to make certain you don't need to replace the crankshaft thrust washers. Replacement is easy once the oil pan is removed.



Current: 1973 TR6 W/Overdrive

Previous:
1963 TR3B W/Overdrive
1962 TR3A
1961 TR3A
1960 TR3A
1960 TR3A

Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA   USA
A good way to check for metal in the oil is to remove the oil filter, open it with a can opener and spread the media out. If lt looks like a gold mine you might be screwed...
Rut

mgcassidy1 Mike Cassidy
Bangor, Maine, USA   USA
Hi,

Thanks for all who responded & offered advise on this issue. Life got in the way and I'm just now getting back to trouble shooting my problem with the oil loss as noted below:

1. Dropped the oil pan this morning & about a 1/2 quart of oil left in pan. 2 or 3 of the front bolts seemed quite loose and there was some fresh oil on the front end.
2. Remaining oil looked okay; slight amount of sludge, but not more than a 1/2 of a teaspoon, no signs of metals with a magnet test or visible observation with one exception....found a small screw about 3/8" long x 3/16" dia. with a beveled head for countersinking. (see photo) Could not find any location where this might have come from! Don't know why there would be such a small screw on the bottom side of the motor!
3. Oil was still clinging & dripping from the Cam, Piston rods & skirts, so took that as a possible good sign.

I haven't found where the initial oil leak was, but my plan is to install a new thrust washer, once I check the gap, new pan gasket & oil and then crank the motor to see if I can find the leak.

If anyone has other suggestions or advise, it is welcome!

Mike



Mike

1976 TR6

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
Look on the last rocker shaft pedestal, the one closest to the cockpit and look on the passenger side of that pedestal...If you see a hole, that's where that screw came from.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1493016 by poolboy Look on the last rocker shaft pedestal, the one closest to the cockpit and look on the passenger side of that pedestal...If you see a hole, that's where that screw came from.

thumbs up

Now letts see under the valve cover.

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BraxtonO Avatar
BraxtonO Gold Member Braxton O
Raleigh, North Carolina, USA   USA
Sounds like you might be lucky. There should have been some knocking or a bang if it seized from oil starvation. I agree - if the starter would turn it over immediately after - with no unusual noise - it may be a less catastrophic failure.

Find the source of the oil leak. If you added a full quart before heading out, sounds like you had a pretty good pre-existing leak. Double check the small wires in, and into, the distributor. Including the ground wire under the plate. I don't normally believe much in coincidences, but I have seen two otherwise unrelated problems create a very difficult to diagnose situation.

Small electrical failures will stop you right now. For the moment. But most of the ways that oil loss will stop a car are all very bad.....

Best,
Braxton



" You know - I love this thing. She's got a few leaks, but it's only the engine, gearbox, and the diff - so not too bad....."

mgcassidy1 Mike Cassidy
Bangor, Maine, USA   USA
Plan to install the TWs today and then remove the valve cover to check if the screw I found in the pan came from the rocker shaft. Do I have it right that the oil grooves on the front TW face forward and the back TW face rearward?

Also, would it be best to get the Scott Helm TWs rather than put in TRF washers?



Mike

1976 TR6

poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
While I don't see anything wrong with the original style (layered) TW's, Scott Helms solid alloy TW's did seem like an improvement,
And.. you do have their position described correctly:
http://trf.zeni.net/TR6bluebook/17.php

j007 Avatar
j007 Joseph M
Madison, Ohio, USA   USA
Thrust washer grooves face front and back of the car, that is the wear surface that will go up against the crankshaft, grooves are for oil, did you check your end play in your crankshaft before ordering your new washers? Make sure when your complete you have the proper end play tolerance. when you put bearing retainer cap back on , torque to the correct spec. Good luck.



Joe
73 Triumph TR6

Lou6t4gto Lou Breslow
Ocala, FL, USA   USA
Probably not a lot left of the block and cylinder bore after that ! LOL

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