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Getting ready to buy my first Triumph

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, Mississippi, USA   USA
I think it would be rare to find a reliable driver for less than 8000 and even in the 10 to 12000 dollar range I think you should be prepared to spend another 2000 over the following 12 months; then because it's still going to be 45 years old, about another 1000 per year from then on (if you can do the work yourself) for as long as you want to keep it on the road.
They can be good, fun and fairly reliable cars and if you are able to get out and drive it like a sports car, you'll find it's worth it.

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clifish Avatar
clifish Cliff Deger
St. James, NY, USA   USA
I too was trying to stay in that range last year...looked at an OD car in RI that had spent most of its life in Houston (good thing a PO brought it north now) and presented like it did. I spent $13,500 on a very solid car with very good original color paint. I have probably put in $2K so far, most of it did not "need" to be done but i want a better than most car, so I replaced things due to wanting to, not having too. There were things that did come up like rebuilding carbs, blew the rear differential, bad tie rod end that had to be addressed. Again if I had to pay someone for all of the above, I would be far more into it, I did not want to get involved with the carbs or 4 wheel alignment due lack of knowledge and specialized tools.



74 TR6 - Carbs by POOLBOY
81 Corvette

dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, New Jersey, USA   USA
Ben, don't pay extra for a paint job unless they can prove proper prep with pics. Buy a car that you can drive. If at that point you like the car,then ask the seller to jack up the rear so you can inspect the frame. Try to bring along someone who knows these cars well. Keep in mind these cars are not easy to sell.

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christopizza Avatar
christopizza CHRIS S
YOUNGSVILLE, NC, USA   USA
1954 Triumph TR2 "Clarence"
1963 Triumph TR4 "Photene"
1969 Triumph TR6
1973 Triumph TR6 "6-Pack"
Not being in a hurry and networking helps. I've had a few cars come to me this way.

I learned to work on cars with my (then) crusty rusty, now trusty TR2.

If you are really new to car mechanical work, practice breaking off bolts on dead lawnmowers, etc to get the hang of how much force is too much for different sized fasteners. So much better to develop a feel for this insread of breaking your prized baby.

It also helps if you are willing to go some distance to find/get your car.

I know of a few folks who bought cars sight unseen and have had the shipped with mixed results. This is where you might be able to get a local forum member to check them out before to lessen risk.

Im not sure of the market in NJ, but l have had good luck selling TRs. I never expect to make much profit. These haven't appreciated like the Healeys, yet....



1954 TR2 long door "Clarence"
1963 TR4 German import "Photene"
1969 TR6 - needs a new home "Rusty"
1973 TR6 - needs paint - mechanicals completed "The Pig"

bltriumph Steve Choquette
Erin, ontario, Canada   CAN
I have a 1971 texas tr6 dark green that I have been refurbishing factory floor's outer rocker panels battery tray is near perfect engine compartment re sprayed just heading to paint shop very very little rust excellent seats and you can contact previous owner in texas for info on the car but many east coast Americans buy cars from me and are super happy 905 873 1774 . I call it a time capsule

gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
In reply to # 1480394 by JBG Thanks gents. The link provided for the buyer guide is great but that's exactly what I'm talking about. The pointers are there what im not sure of is if i know what's bad and whats REALLY bad when im looking at those things.

Rust probably gonna be the most expensive to fix. It's body work plus prep and paint. Not cheap.

If the engine is usually indestructible unless the thrust washers have departed from where they're supposed to be. I suppose you can buy a Bentley manual prior to buying...read up in thrust washers. That subject is covered at length on 6-pack.

Find a few cars, post the links here or over on 6-pack. We just love knocking down cars...not necessarily a bad thing

Don't be bashful about looking at cars across country. 6-pack has a surrogate buyer network for members

Regards

Todd
(Contributer to buyers guide)

JBG Ben G
Portland, maine, USA   USA
Just ran across this one thats close enough for me to check out on a weekend. Any thoughts here? https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/cto/d/triumph-tr6-1973/6301343413.html

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gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
Or this one

It was on eBay a little while back & didn't sell at 15k, but look at what you get!!

https://www.ebay.com/i/132332720199

JBG Ben G
Portland, maine, USA   USA
Ideally I want to spend much less than that. Thats a very nice car but i dont think i need one quite that nice

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dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, New Jersey, USA   USA
Ben, I like this white one. If it does run good and the frame is good. I prefer a car with original paint, what you see is what you get. I think the vin # is missing a digit. Dan

boulderroller Avatar
boulderroller Silver Member Brian Cunningham
Farmington, Connecticut, USA   USA
1973 Triumph TR6 "Liz"
The VIN for the White car is appropriate. My '73 is CF4325U built in January 1973.

Happy hunting!



1973 TR6 CF4325U
"A" Type OD
Dual Webers

dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, New Jersey, USA   USA
Brian, are you saying they only made 4 thousand three hundred and twenty five tr6's up to your car? My 75 has 5 digits, 38777. In 1973 they exported11,705 cars, I must be missing something

gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA   USA
In reply to # 1486712 by dsixnero Brian, are you saying they only made 4 thousand three hundred and twenty five tr6's up to your car? My 75 has 5 digits, 38777. In 1973 they exported11,705 cars, I must be missing something

Uh no

They started with CC25xxxL. In 73 they switched to CF

There were approximately 95k TR6s made

dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, New Jersey, USA   USA
Now I see, they started over with the CF 1

Stefenas STEPHEN s
Ferndale, California, USA   USA
Its good that you are asking for advice up front...beats lessons learned through bad mistakes.

To assure that you find a vehicle that is relatively rust free, look for cars from dry states such as California, Arizona and Southern Nevada. Also chances are better if you avoid wet states such as states in the hurricane belt or where there is obvious flooding, or coastal influence thru salt exposure. Also stay away from areas known for hail storms...

However you make a choice, make sure that you personally investigate (by due diligence) or retain an Certified Inspection firm located in the region of the vehicle. Any classic car insurance company will provide a list of competent Inspection firms.

I happen to have a 1976 TR6 (BRG) with a rag & hardtop that is possibly a 95-Point car which is located in Northern California...also have a 62 Thunderbird (Thunder Chicken) and a late Corvette...all California cars...and no visible signs of rust. Recently sold my Classic 1955 Chevy truck originally purchased from the Phoenix area...again a 62 year old vehicle and totally rust free....

So it pays to do you're due diligence before investing hard earned money...resale value improves as well.

Always take a magnet (and mirror with an extendable handle) with you when looking at any vehicle...check all painted areas with the magnet for bondo...check under the frame for fresh paint or undercoating...any evidence whatever...don't walk away...run like hell! Take screwdrivers, ice picks, hammer, camera and flash in you're bag of goodies...

If you buy a vehicle from a dry state you may pay upwards to $1000 or more for shipping...compare that cost to the expense of doing a ground up restoration to get rid of rust...

Also, for giggles, review Chip Foose 'Overhaulin' renovation clips and see the results of media blasting...swiss cheese at best...what looks like solid paint ends up being structural paint...

Enjoy the experience...its rewarding.

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