TRExp

TR6 Tech Forum

Dustless blasting

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Wire wheel guy Jim Smith
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA   USA
I thought I would start a new topic on dustless blasting asking for experience that others have had.
An ongoing topic of sandblasting the frame had a suggestion that we should look into the new dustless method of blasting since it does not leave a big mess and is effective.
This is also called hydro blasting. It basically is high pressure water blasting with finely ground glass as the media included in the water. The benefits are that it does not create a huge mess and does not warp anything.
I am not sure if it is worth the extra expense for just doing the frame, but it sounds like a terrific way of stripping the paint off the rest of the car since it will not warp anything (no heat), removes all rust and body filler, and does not leave any kind of a coating that could be a problem for the paint.
Has anyone used this method and how much did it cost?
Thanks,
Jim

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
In reply to # 1464308 by Wire wheel guy I thought I would start a new topic on dustless blasting asking for experience that others have had.
An ongoing topic of sandblasting the frame had a suggestion that we should look into the new dustless method of blasting since it does not leave a big mess and is effective.
This is also called hydro blasting. It basically is high pressure water blasting with finely ground glass as the media included in the water. The benefits are that it does not create a huge mess and does not warp anything.
I am not sure if it is worth the extra expense for just doing the frame, but it sounds like a terrific way of stripping the paint off the rest of the car since it will not warp anything (no heat), removes all rust and body filler, and does not leave any kind of a coating that could be a problem for the paint.
Has anyone used this method and how much did it cost?
Thanks,
Jim

Hi Jim-
I was the one who recommended it on the other thread: I've only seen the videos & results, I haven't used it myself, but it looks really great... As I mentioned- I just wish I had the money to purchase the equipment & a franchise!

Scott

Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA   USA
Jim,
I contacted a guy in N AL about doing a Bugeye for me and he said he could do it in the driveway with a tarp and sand bags to collect the detritus. The Bugeye is a very small car and the cost was $1200 and he would add the rust preventative to stave off flash rusting, but the time frame for priming was pretty short...can't remember what he quoted. I elected to go with traditional sand blasting followed by epoxy primer from a guy in N AL who had painted a number of LBCs that were show winners. The blasting cost $800 and since he did the body work and painting I don't know the primer cost. I'm very pleased with everything he did from prep to paint and I took my car to him on the rotisserie to make it easier (cheaper) for both of us. The entire bill was only $3k and I'll be taking my TR4a tub to him once I get to that point. I'm sure the TR4a will cost more since I wanted single stage on my Bugeye and will be using more expensive paint on my TRs.
Rut

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Attachments:
IMG_1653.JPG    60.1 KB
IMG_1653.JPG

Wire wheel guy Jim Smith
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA   USA
If you look at the commercial for the dustless blasting, they talk about charging $1,000 to do a chevy impala. They say the glass media is $60 for the job (and reusable) and the total time to do a car is less than 2 hours. That is why Scott wants a franchise!
I read that the rust preventative is good for 72 hours, which requires some pretty good time coordination.
I spoke with someone that does paint work in his home booth that knows a place in Slidell, La that charges $400 if you bring the car stripped of the fenders, etc.
I just wonder if it is really necessary for the tub that does not have much space that shows after reassembly, but if it is reasonable, it makes sense.
I am told soda blasting leaves a residue that you can't get off and peels the paint and sand blasting creates a lot of heat that can warp body panels.
Jim

ed.h Ed Hollingsworth
Omaha, Nebraska, USA   USA
Jim--

I've done quite a bit of DIY blasting and have never noticed any tendency for the metal surface to heat up. If anything, it seems just the opposite. Depressurizing air cools it.

There is a danger of warping panels during blasting, but I believe it is just from the physical pressure of the air and media. Fortunately for me, my setup isn't powerful enough to distort panels.

As for the mess, not having dust would be really nice, but you'd still have all the spent media to clean up.

I'd probably try wet blasting if the equipment were reasonable, but I suspect it would be just trading one set of drawbacks for another.

Ed

Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA   USA
I'll add one more to the conversation. A friend who owns a machine shop that I frequent has an MGA and he used his pressure washer with an attachment for sand blasting to blast his car and he was very happy with the results...no warping and he said it was pretty fast. Just an FYI...
Rut

clifish Avatar
clifish Cliff Deger
St. James, NY, USA   USA
I wonder if you could that pressure wash attachment with soda media? If it could still be abrasive before it dissolves it would be way less messy.



74 TR6 - Carbs by POOLBOY
81 Corvette

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
One of the Q&A answers for this one says "not recommended". I can't imagine there would be very much solid soda left by the time it went through the nozzle and got to the workpiece.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200660204_200660204



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

Wire wheel guy Jim Smith
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA   USA
I just returned from a visit with some guys that have one of the dustless blasting machines. They bought it for their corvette restoration business because it apparently does a good job on fiberglass and they do some outside blasting when they have the time to help pay for the equipment.
I see what Scott meant earlier about the cost. They told me the blasting pot was $10,000 and they had to buy another air compressor to use it. Apparently none of the "home" versions 100 gallons or less is adequate.
They did say that after 5 years of owning it, they are still very happy with the results but said you still have to be very careful because of the extreme pressure coming out of it. They also said that the commercial was a joke about doing a whole car in 2 hours or less and that the whole process was very slow.
They charge about $1,000 to do a whole car and then another $200 to epoxy prime it. They also said that the 72 hours that they advertise for the period that it would not rust might work in Los Vegas but not in any humid part of the country. It needs to be primed pretty quickly.
They also recommended that I blast everything prior to any metal work because it removes all of the rust and let's you see exactly what needs to be done.
I am going to guess that prices to do this work are all over the board depending on demand and supply, but finding someone that has all the expensive equipment is more of of a challenge.
Jim

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
maxd Avatar
maxd Bill D
Fort Pierce, Florida, USA   USA
Just a note about the soda blasting. It seems to have come and gone as no paint manufacturer will warrant there paint on a car that's been soda blasted.
BD

mgruber921 Avatar
mgruber921 Marvin Gruber
Florence, Alabama, USA   USA
We used hydro blasting at work, its pretty dangerous. A mistep and the high pressure can rip thru a leg or arm. We also tried C02 pellet blasting. It didn't strip paint or rust off. Talk about expensive. We used it once to clean a rad contaminated elec mtr, Cost was $60k back in the 90s. I do the plain old sand blast method.
Marv

dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
My Dad had a part "dustless" blasted. I believe it was a couple of bumper brackets. For whatever reason he could never get them to stop rusting. He had them blasted and then primered within 24 hours but they both started rusting under the primer. He sandblasted them and they both still kept rusting under the paint.
It was pretty strange.
I don't know if it did something to the metal or what but he had to replace both of them.

glenzo654 glenn brackett
buzzards bay, mass, USA   USA
we have a mobile sand blasting business on cape cod and do both dustless and conventional dry blasting each having its advantages/disadvantages
the initial cost of a dustless pot is 5 times the cost of a dry blast pot 15k for a DB800 vrs 3k for the same size dry pot!
either way needs a commercial compressor to operate properly a 185CFM is barely enough air to run just the pot without breathing air they recommend a 210 minimum for the DB800!
the wet blasting works great on flat surfaces ie the outside of a car a boat bottom a wall for graffiti but as soon as you get into any kind of corner or protrusion its anything but clean you get absolutely covered in shit its not like they show on tv with a guy wearing shorts and sunglasses and not getting dirty total BS
the wet system does a nice job on car body panels as far as not distorting any thing but you spend just as much time washing the mud out of all the crevices which makes it a two person job one to blast and one to wash it down right away so the mud doesnt become cement like and then rinse them with hold tight to prevent rust
dry blasting done wrong can destroy body panels in any modern car thats not made with 16 ga steel !it makes for easy cleanup because you simply blow it off after but you need to be in a contained area with dust collection or out in the desert where no one cares because the dust goes everywhere!
glenn

jsz Jeff Z
Warren, PA, USA   USA
I tried dustless blasting on a hood, trunk and doors on a Fiat Spider I am restoring. Looked good until I got back to my shop and was prepping for epoxy. The trunk surface metal was so stretched and warped, I could not salvage it. The hood I did salvage with a great deal of shrinking. Doors were less of an issue. The metal was original paint, no rust so a bit upset to have lost it. The hood metal was so stretched it picked up the circles underneath on the inner structure. Clearly shot head on and at a great deal of pressure.
So the lesson for me was to stay with my traditional blaster, who understands the issues of blasting sheet metal.
Could it have been the dustless blaster experience? Sure, however not worth the risk of any more panels. Also my traditional blaster charges about half of what I paid for dustless.

glenzo654 glenn brackett
buzzards bay, mass, USA   USA
to jeff z
obviously whomever you took your parts too was one of the millions of people who watch car shows and decided he could do that without having a clue what he was doing with it
when we do cars we use no more than 60 psi and fine media(the recycled bottle glass in 40/70 works real good) mind you the compressor im using is a 250 cfm unit
(250 cfm at 60 psi = a shit load of air volume) automotive paint comes off about as fast as you can move the hose nozzle with no damage to the panels
glenn

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster