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40 yo starter, rebuild or replace

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I'm deep into an engine build and I have a 40 year old starter sitting on the floor or my garage. I'm wondering what to do with it.

  1. Rebuild it myself
  2. Have the pros rebuild it
  3. Replace it with a newer, better, faster, lighter starter

A new "high torque" starter is just under $300 from multiple vendors, before tax and shipping. I expect shipping to be considerable.

This starter looks like hell but it worked when I pulled it out. Occasionally it would fail to catch and would spin free. Most likely a failure of the solenoid engaging the ring gear. The ring gear teeth and the starter gear teeth look fine.

Let's say for the sake of discussion that I want to consider letting someone local (Seattle) rebuild it, how do I find a shop? What do I look for? Foreign car repair? Electric motor specialists? Vintage restoration?

I know I can send it out as a 'core' for exchange. This seems prohibitive to me. This thing is big and heavy. I'm guessing it's going to cost $40 to ship each way. Add to that the rebuilt stock starter is the same cost as a new, better starter after the 'core' exchange refund.

Thoughts?

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
twomanytriumphs Avatar
twomanytriumphs Gold Member Kyle Darby
Kelso, WA, USA   USA
1965 Triumph TR4 "My Baby"
1966 Triumph 2000 MkI "Bessie"
1970 Triumph GT6+ (MkII) "The Princess"
1977 MG MGB
They fit in a large flat rate box... Not that I have shipped a GT6 flywheel that way or anything...

Seriously though, I have used PMX in Portland Oregon for several years now after my local rebuild/hack shop angered me. I found this shop via the Portland Triumph club. BP Northwest has this one TR6 starter as well.

My experience on old starters and new engines is that they fail. The one in my truck lasted about 6 months and I replaced it with a gear reduction as well. 3 out of my 4 British cars have them as well, the MGB will get one if I need it. Kyle.

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ed.h Ed Hollingsworth
Omaha, NE, USA   USA
This might provide some info to help you decide. It was pretty cheap.

http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-5/TR6-5.html

Regards,

Ed

titanic Berry P
Albany, OR, USA   USA
Steve-I have found this to be the best deal on a high torque starter-$175 including shipping. http://www.britishstarters.com/Triumph.html
Mine has been in use for 2 years with no problems. I think these people are the supplier of gear reduction starters for most vendors.
Berry

hogan1945 Avatar
hogan1945 Silver Member Douglas F
Woodbury, MN, USA   USA
1968 Pontiac GTO "Tempest"
1976 Triumph TR6
1976 Triumph TR6
1976 Triumph TR6    & more
Gear reduction is the way to go. Did mine last year, turn the key "zoom", TR starts so much nicer. Highly recommend it.
Good luck

maddmapper Avatar
maddmapper Ken Prentice
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
Steve,

Am considering the same with my TR250 project. I have one of these to rebuild but I don't think I'll be going the "new" high torque route.

After reading Ed's rebuild, I figured I give it go myself. If I bugger it up, then I'll hand it over to the "professionals".

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Attachments:
140-400_1.jpg    12.1 KB
140-400_1.jpg

tirebiter Jeff Garber
Dighton, MA, USA   USA
Has anybody here actually bothered to measure what RPM a new reduction starter spins a TR-6 engine ?

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1256571 by Rex A Lott I'm deep into an engine build and I have a 40 year old starter sitting on the floor or my garage. I'm wondering what to do with it.

  1. Rebuild it myself
  2. Have the pros rebuild it
  3. Replace it with a newer, better, faster, lighter starter

A new "high torque" starter is just under $300 from multiple vendors, before tax and shipping. I expect shipping to be considerable.

This starter looks like hell but it worked when I pulled it out. Occasionally it would fail to catch and would spin free. Most likely a failure of the solenoid engaging the ring gear. The ring gear teeth and the starter gear teeth look fine.

Let's say for the sake of discussion that I want to consider letting someone local (Seattle) rebuild it, how do I find a shop? What do I look for? Foreign car repair? Electric motor specialists? Vintage restoration?

I know I can send it out as a 'core' for exchange. This seems prohibitive to me. This thing is big and heavy. I'm guessing it's going to cost $40 to ship each way. Add to that the rebuilt stock starter is the same cost as a new, better starter after the 'core' exchange refund.

Thoughts?

Rex:

I took mine to a local automotive electric shop, they rebuilt mine for $120, about half the cost of a high torque starter. It spins the motor plenty fast, and of course it keeps the car original which retains value in the sale price.

Look in the yellow pages under automotive electric repairs. You will have a shop somewhere close by. No shipping that way.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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Punkdogstr6 Doug Lawson
Culver City, CA, USA   USA
You might be amazed if you take it apart then clean and lubricat it. The contacts in the solenoid wear but you can reverse them so the contact points are like new.
If your engine is in tune the original starter is more than adiquit.
A lot of the new Chinese stuff is not so hot.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Thanks everyone.

I'm going to try my hand at cleaning and refurbishing the stock starter myself. I will probably just reuse existing bushings/bearings unless I find a problem like a bad bushing, bad solenoid or chipped teeth or (??). If that doesn't work, I'll upgrade to some newer technology.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I went looking for a rebuild kit but there is none. So I guess I'll wing it. What material do I use for bushings?

SAE 841—Also called Oilite®, this porous material is impregnated with roughly 19% SAE 30 oil. The oil reduces wear as well as required maintenance.
Graphite SAE 841—This porous material is impregnated with a graphite-based material, which provides low-friction dry lubrication in a wide range of temperatures.
SAE 863—Also called Super Oilite®, this material is similar to SAE 841, but contains more iron for greater strength. Note: Color is silver because of the iron.
Alloy 932—Also known as SAE 660, this nonporous, cast material makes hard, strong, and abrasion-resistant bearings with excellent resistance to shock loads (suddenly applied loads) and wear.
Alloy 954—This nonporous, cast material is harder, stronger, and withstands an even wider temperature range than Alloy 932.


Sadly there are references to what I need like this
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lucas-pre-engaged-starter-repair-overhaul/dp/B009UVXCFK
and this
http://trf.zeni.net/TR6greenbook/14.php?s_wt=1600&s_ht=900

but no parts are in stock. I'll have to order ah la carte' from McMaster Carr.

HuffDaddy Avatar
HuffDaddy Scott H
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Huff Daddy"
I changed my starter about 3 years ago to a reduced gear and it has been a godsend. Starting is a breeze and it along with the spin on oil filter adapter are the only two items that are not original or original aftermarket on my TR6. Two worthwhile and practical exceptions. My 2 cents.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1264845 by HuffDaddy I changed my starter about 3 years ago to a reduced gear and it has been a godsend. Starting is a breeze and it along with the spin on oil filter adapter are the only two items that are not original or original aftermarket on my TR6. Two worthwhile and practical exceptions. My 2 cents.

You are ruining all the fun Scott. It's my intention to completely rebuild the starter using difficult to find parts from all corners of the globe only to determine that I reassembled the starter incorrectly.

...and THEN... and only then... I will replace this starter with a new "high torque" starter for only $200... give or take.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
BTW, yes on the oil filter upgrade. That's a good one.

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