TRExp

TR6 Tech Forum

Replacement tires for 185 R 15 for TR6

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Damson1971 Mike L
Orlando, FL, USA   USA
Great looking Car and your right the tires do look really good. Glad the tires are made in the good ole USA, quality is usually assured.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Casey808 Avatar
Casey808 Casey S
Honolulu, HI, USA   USA
1969 Triumph TR6 "Adèle"
In reply to # 1512227 by Damson1971 ...what other companies make the redlines?

FWIW, a great redline tire is the Diamond Back Classics MX Defender.

Here is a Michelin Defender discussion link along with TR6 owner testimony and tire photos for consideration.

Keep 'em on the road! Cheers! smileys with beer

South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
redline looks great. i had them on 1974 since 1974, and even in 1978/79
they were treacherous tires. there is much better stuff even these days
and you'll soon forget about redlines after you drive good tires fifty miles or so...
185 HR 15 XVS michelins... even if made in serbia.
after all, if you have gone to webers, oil catch tank, spin on filter adaptors,
horrors: electronic ignition, raised and lowerd springs and the fancy camshafts
etc etc etc... there is no room left for shouting redlines as originality anymore,
and since they are not michelin, but coker etc... why worry?
buy good original size as you can (or not, if you are replacing wheels)...
but above all, go for tire quality over lipstick concerns, tires are the basis
for your safety, besides your common sense...
regardez
wes

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Sapphire Avatar
Sapphire Walt P
York, PA, USA   USA
It is my understanding that Diamond Back can vulcanize a redline on any tire that you send them.



1972 CC80594U Sapphire Blue

HuffDaddy Avatar
HuffDaddy Scott H
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Huff Daddy"
Douglas,
Looks like your turn signal/parking lights are 1975, rather than 1976. Did you just like them better? Curious as I also have a Carmine Red 1976 (Built Sept 1975), but have the solid amber lenses, which indicate 1976.
Scott Huff

HuffDaddy Avatar
HuffDaddy Scott H
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Huff Daddy"
Walt P,
DiamondBack did my tires, however, they actually procured the tires (of my choice Michelin Pilot Exalto PE2 Summer Tires) and then added the redwalls. Very expensive, but I was able to get the best of both worlds.

Brad T,
Looks like you are a neighbor in SC. Diamond Back is only 120 miles or so from you. You could actually pick up your tires and save about $20 per tire.

Looked like spring is just around the corner with a lovely driving day, today!
Scott Huff

hogan1945 Avatar
hogan1945 Silver Member Douglas F
Woodbury, MN, USA   USA
1968 Pontiac GTO "Tempest"
1976 Triumph TR6
1976 Triumph TR6
1976 Triumph TR6    & more
Scott,
Your right, my 6 is a 76, but the donor car was a 75. I just like the the 75 better than the 76. I use to have the 76 installed

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Gypsy Rose T..."
I have Cooper tires on my 74 TR6, and I love them... I have never even had them balanced, and they run great! And that includes running at 90...

Scott

badornato adornato bruce
menlo park ca 94025, CA, USA   USA
1959 Triumph TR3A
1959 Triumph TR3A "TR"
One of the posts brought up something interesting:

I have a 59 TR3 with Panasport wheels and 215 (!) x 15 inch Sumitomo tires. (they are actually too big for the handling of the car and I intend to go back to 185's when they wear down a little).

The question is how do I calculate the speed difference on the speedo from stock 165 tires? (use the GPS on my phone?)

bruce adornato
menlo park california

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Casey808 Avatar
Casey808 Casey S
Honolulu, HI, USA   USA
1969 Triumph TR6 "Adèle"
In reply to # 1512810 by badornato ...how do I calculate the speed difference on the speedo from stock 165 tires? (use the GPS on my phone?)

bruce adornato
menlo park california

Try using a Speedometer Calibration Calculator, it's quick and gives you a mathematical ballpark idea.

I understand from other Triumph owners the older Smiths speedometers were originally calibrated to read a wee bit higher than actual speed to trick drivers into not driving as fast as they thought they were going, how true this urban myth is can be debated. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Keep 'em on the road! Cheers!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-11 03:57 PM by Casey808.

South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
as piss poor as traffic is in California, except very early in the morning, very late at night...
on roads where no one goes (these are secret, no one knows about them), why put so fine
a lens on it. A USA spec TR6 4 speed no overdrive, with original Michelin 185 R15...
(and with XVS 185HR15, being so close to originals in circumference) 50 mph is right at 3400/3500
rpm... the machine (at least my October 1974 , US Spec, is very happy romping along
at that condition, although haas seen in extreme tests in excess of 100 mph... risking the CHP and the hoosegow,
which is an area of performance I no longer need to tempt.
It is not without merit, this concern for actual MPH vis a vis tire changes... but with roads so generally
clogged with fellow motorists at nearly all hours... this information is not so critical as it once was.
Mine registered such figures 40 years ago and still does this day...
don't worry, be happy as song goes...
I took machine out for a small drive yesterday and today... it is virtually all stock... 37000 true miles,
one extensive rebuild owing to 21 years storage gumming up the works... I will say... ther machine is
docile, tractable... and you get into 50 mph and beyond and soon as they say, it cries out for a fifth gear...
Seems engine could handle the load and be more relaxed at final gear... but those of us not
blessed with overdrive and PI... this is what we have...
Still, if I were tooling down the road and 50 mph started registering much higher than 3500 rpm,
I start looking at clutch slippage... etc etc...
yeah 50 mph at 3400 rpm is high compared to today (but in 1974 it was not so bad, at least has not
changed for this car)... now with 6 cylinders same speed... mmm...cars routinely turn 2000 rpm...
I think my C300 2011 Mercedes runs 2000 at 70 mph on level ground automatic tranns... not a fair cmparison...
true... but clearly is workig less rpm than TR...(but TR is light year more fun, like operating a machine set...
rather than a computer...
what a change of views...

regardez
wes

Dan1972TR6 Avatar
Dan1972TR6 Dan Gottleib
Summerville, SC, USA   USA
I did a lot of research on this as well. I finally settled on BF Goodrich Silvertown Redline Radials (P205/75R15). They match up in diameter and aspect ratio but are much wider than the original spec tires. They fill up the wheel well and provide a racing tire look. Bought on line, had them shipped to a Tire dealer direct for installation. ride and handle well.



Dan Gottleib
Summerville, SC
1972 TR 6 (acquired 1989)


Attachments:
73 TR.jpg    68.4 KB
73 TR.jpg

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster





Join The Club

Sign in to ask questions, share photos, and access all website features

Your Cars

1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead

Text Size

Larger Smaller
Reset Save

Sponsor Links