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Moss Motors
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Mail From: (email redacted) (DUHART JOHN)

Hey All,



I've been looking through to Bently manual on the recommended procedure
for removing the front and rear suspension. My question involves the
springs. Bently calls out a procedure that uses a jack to compress the
spring while us loosen the nuts. Is this a safe way to do things? Is
this the way most people do this stuff?



I've notice that TRF and Moss both sell tools for compressing the
springs, and looks like a safer approach. Does anyone have any
experience with these tools? Also, I'll bet I can just go down to my
local Parts shop, or Sears to get a spring compression tool. What do you
think?



Thanks,

JHD IV





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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: R John Lye <(email redacted)>

On Jan 16, 10:28am, DUHART JOHN wrote:

> I've notice that TRF and Moss both sell tools for compressing the
> springs, and looks like a safer approach. Does anyone have any
> experience with these tools?

Yup, I've got one of TRF's tools and used it a lot when I was
swapping front springs on my TR-4 while dialing in the right
settings for autocrossing. I'd say that its the only safe way
to compress these springs - you can make your own choice...

> Also, I'll bet I can just go down to my
> local Parts shop, or Sears to get a spring compression tool. What do you
> think?

The generic spring compressors don't work as well as the ones
that are specifically made for our cars. The ones the TRF and
Moss sell essentially replace the shock and put the load where
its supposed to be. Its not hard to make a similar tool from
some threaded rod, some nuts and washers and a chunk of metal,
but the TRF one is cheap enough that I decided that it wasn't
worth my time to fabricate one.

John Lye

(email redacted)


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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: Gregory Petrolati <(email redacted)>

On Tue, 16 Jan 1996, R John Lye wrote:

> > experience with these tools?
>
> Yup, I've got one of TRF's tools and used it a lot when I was
> swapping front springs on my TR-4 while dialing in the right
> settings for autocrossing. I'd say that its the only safe way
> to compress these springs - you can make your own choice...

John has the right of it...

I built my own from threaded rod, nuts, washers and hardwood...
I wasn't all that happy with how it performed.. When I redo the front
on my `4 again I'll buy one from TRF.

Greg Petrolati

(email redacted) 1962 TR4 (CT4852L)
"That's not a leak... My car is just marking its territory!"
Greg Petrolati, Champaign, Illinois



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Mail From: (email redacted) (Ross Vincente -- TransAmer. Financial - Los Angeles )



To: Triumphs List, Inet


On Tues, 1/16 JOHN DUHART wrote:
[snip] I've been looking through to Bently manual on the
recommended procedure for removing the front and rear
suspension. My question involves the springs. Bently calls out
a procedure that uses a jack to compress the spring while us
loosen the nuts. Is this a safe way to do things? Is this the
way most people do this stuff? [snip]

Crimmony! Are you serious? DON'T DO IT. Very nasty things can
happen when a compressed spring becomes "uncompressed" in a hurry.
I don't know the numbers, but a compressed spring stores several
tons of energy and if let loose in an uncontrolled manner can
cause serious personal injury, take out an eye, etc. ad naseum.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

[snip] I've notice that TRF and Moss both sell tools for
compressing the springs, and looks like a safer approach. Does
anyone have any experience with these tools? Also, I'll bet I
can just go down to my local Parts shop, or Sears to get a
spring compression tool. [snip]

Yes. A much smarter and safer alternative. Cheaper too if you
factor in the medical costs you would have had to pay after the
"Bently Method" exploded in your face. Do yourself a favor and
spend a few extra bucks buying a "good" compressor, even if you
only plan on using it once or twice.

Good luck.

Ross D. Vincenti
64 Spitfire Mk I (undergoing surgery)




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Mail From: Glenn Franco <(email redacted)>


On Jan 16, John Lye wrote:


> Yup, I've got one of TRF's tools and used it a lot when I was
> swapping front springs on my TR-4 while dialing in the right
> settings for autocrossing. I'd say that its the only safe way
> to compress these springs - you can make your own choice...

(original post)
> I've notice that TRF and Moss both sell tools for compressing
the
> springs, and looks like a safer approach. Does anyone have any
> experience with these tools?


"Believe it or not" TRF actually provided directions for the fabrication of this
spring compressor in their earlier (91/92 Calender year) sales newsletters. The
tool is merely a 1/2" threaded rod with a stack of large 1/2 inch washers that
sit on the shock tower and (at the time) a solid 2x4 with a 1/2" hole located at
the center (5/16" steel plate would be suitable if in doubt). Double nut each
end and make sure that the 2X4 or plate is long enough to span the spring pan
fore and aft. Follow the directions in the Bentley Manual and its a fairly
simple process.

I fabricated mine and have assembled one and disassembled two parts cars with
it. Total cost is less that $5.00 with all pieces available from your local
hardware store.

That was back when it use to be a pretty good source of info with lots of tips
and suggestions from TRF and other restorers. Moss put out a similar newsletter
with good info.

Just my $.02 worth!

Glenn Franco

Still looking for a good used TR6 limited slip!

email at (email redacted) or (email redacted)

1971 TR6
1974 TR6 (collecting parts for frame off)
1976 MGB
1985 Jeep Scrambler (frame off fiberglass body restoration in process)



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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: (email redacted) (Thomas Augustus Kimberly)

>
> Hey All,
>
> I've been looking through to Bently manual on the recommended procedure
> for removing the front and rear suspension. My question involves the
> springs. Bently calls out a procedure that uses a jack to compress the
> spring while us loosen the nuts. Is this a safe way to do things? Is
> this the way most people do this stuff?
>
> Thanks,
>
> JHD IV
>

On my TR6 on the rearend I was able to get away with just taking loose the
shock then using a jack to let the rear arm down slowllly to get the
springs out. On the front I got complicated and went and bought some 3/8"
threaded steel dowels and put them one at a time through the bolt holes in
the spring pan then ran nuts tight on them and used these to sloowwllly
let the spring down and pull the spring back up. It made me really happy
to have my 9/16" box end ratchet thingy from Napa.
A friend of mine did his front springs with a standard spring compressor
and had to beat on things with a whoompin stick. (While I went inside to
drink tea and avoid getting sprung.) And since has bought the Moss tool
which is basically just a 1/2" threaded steel dowel with a plate at the
bottom which will bolt to the shock mounting studs on the bottom of the
spring pan.
-Thomas



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Mail From: (email redacted)

JHD,

You probably won't find the right spring compression tool for TR front
springs at Sears. I took mine off with one of the "claw" type which clamp on
from either side. By the time the springs were compressed enough to remove,
the clamps were only about 60 degrees apart. It was starting to get scary.
I followed the Bentley procedure to put the springs back in, and it seemed
safer. Because the plate on the lower A-frame un-bolts, it provides a
convenient path to remove the springs. The springs are "contained" by tower
for the upper A-frame until they are nearly un-compressed. The lower A-frame
plate required a certain amount of cussing and persuasion to get back into
place, but in general that is the way I would do it again. Good luck,

Jim Harroun
'61 TR-3B


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