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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: (email redacted) (DUHART JOHN)

Hey All,



I have a general question for everyone. As I have said before, I intend
to a 'down to the frame' restoration on the TR6 this summer/fall. This
frame needs some fixing, and so does the engine and some body panels will
be replaced as well. (It sounds like there are a lot of people out there
that have done this type of stuff on a regular basis!)



My question is, how/where do you guys store all those body parts you
have removed while the rebuild is going on. I have a one car garage, and
space is tight. My big worry is what I am going to do with the body
shell, once I left it off the frame. Does it make sense to disassemble
it entirely? I would be interested in hearing some peoples stories on
what they have done.



Thanks,

JHD IV





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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: David Rupert <(email redacted)>

John,

How tall and sturdy is your garage? I lifted my TR4 off the frame with some
sturdy ropes thrown over the rafters. I then rebuilt the chassis while the body
hung there.

David Rupert
(email redacted)
1967 TR4 (rigid axle)
1980 TR7 convertible



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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: David Rupert <(email redacted)>

Fumi,
Not much to tell, really. I removed the doors, bonnet, and trunk lid, then
stripped the interior. I made up some cleats (like you find on boats) and
bolted them to the rafters in the garage. Made sure all the extras were
stripped off the bodyshell, then unbolted the whole thing. On the TR4, there
are eye bolts at the bottom of the B posts (for seat belts) that I tied ropes
to, plus two more through mounting holes in the engine bay. Got a case of beer
and enticed a couple friends to come over and lift up one end of the bodyshell
at a time while I wrapped the other end of the ropes around the cleats.
Once it was hanging, I found that I could lift a corner of the car while
standing on a ladder, and quickly rewrap the rope around the cleat with the
other hand. But then I've always had more muscle then brains. Once the fenders
were off, the whole bodyshell was pretty easy to move around by myself.

David Rupert
(email redacted)
1967 TR4A (rigid axle)
1980 TR7 convertible



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The Interwebs, USA   USA
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Mail From: Gregory Petrolati <(email redacted)>

On 5 Jan 1996, David Rupert wrote:

> John,
>
> How tall and sturdy is your garage? I lifted my TR4 off the frame with some
> sturdy ropes thrown over the rafters. I then rebuilt the chassis while the body
> hung there.
>

Hmmm, I don't think I'd try that trick in the garage where I
rebuilt my TR4. I remember a few years back while I was doing the final
prepwork on The Green Man. I was wet sanding the high build
primer. I had a bit of a rhythm going, the car was rocking a bit.
Suddenly, I heard a counterpoint rattle coming from all around me...
It was the garage swaying to the "beat" of an earthquake. I know
Earthquakes are no big deal to you left coasters, in central Illinois
it is a bit of a novelty.

Greg (waitin' for the BIG ONE) Petrolati

(email redacted) 1962 TR4 (CT4852L)
"That's not a leak... My car is just marking its territory!"
Greg Petrolati, Champaign, Illinois



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Mail From: "Richard Jackson - Network Technician ext. 2570"
<(email redacted)>


Greg wrote:-

> Hmmm, I don't think I'd try that trick in the garage where I
> rebuilt my TR4. I remember a few years back while I was doing the final
> prepwork on The Green Man. I was wet sanding the high build
> primer. I had a bit of a rhythm going, the car was rocking a bit.
> Suddenly, I heard a counterpoint rattle coming from all around me...
> It was the garage swaying to the "beat" of an earthquake. I know
> Earthquakes are no big deal to you left coasters, in central Illinois
> it is a bit of a novelty.

> Greg (waitin' for the BIG ONE) Petrolati

I remember sitting with my legs underneath my Austin A40 Farina (It was on axle
stands for all you safety conscious people) finishing the body rebuild a couple
of years ago when I felt my Bum/Ass/Arse/etc wiggle on the ground, I just
thought I was having a funny turn or something :-) so I ignored it, a bit later
on I heard on the radio that the East Midlands (We're talking England here) had
had a mild tremor, THAT was a surprise.

OK, thats it, please don't flame me for non-Triumph content.

Rich.

ps, Greg, ain't it about time you got that oil leak sorted. :-)


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Mail From: (email redacted)

JHD,

When I did the frame-off work on my TR-3, I had a two car garage, but I left
half of it open for my functional car. I built a sort of shelf to store the
body on, and stored the frame, etc. underneath. This made it possible to
clean, sandblast and re-paint the underside of the body while it was on the
"shelf". My garage still looks like an old-fashioned general store with body
parts hanging on the walls, a hard top, baby strollers and everything but the
kitchen sink hanging from the cieling...
Your body is probably heavier than mine, so you will have to be more careful
about structural integrity, and will have to find more friends to lift it on
and off. Have fun.

Jim Harroun


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Mail From: Gregory Petrolati <(email redacted)>

On Mon, 8 Jan 1996, Richard Jackson - Network Technician ext. 2570 wrote:

> Rich.
>
> ps, Greg, ain't it about time you got that oil leak sorted. :-)
>
If you're noticing it way over there... maybe I better... (sigh)

I was kinda hoping to replenish our nation's dwindling oil reserves

Greg (oily to bed and oily to rise) Petrolati

(email redacted) 1962 TR4 (CT4852L)
"That's not a leak... My car is just marking its territory!"
Greg Petrolati, Champaign, Illinois



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Mail From: "Lee Daniels, (email redacted)" <(email redacted)>

>My question is, how/where do you guys store all those body parts you
>have removed while the rebuild is going on.
>My big worry is what I am going to do with the body
>shell, once I lift it off the frame.

John -

I removed all four fenders and hung them on the walls of my garage. When
it was time to lift the body shell off the frame, I bought two 8-ft pine
4x4's and 16 cinder blocks. I then lifted each end of the body from the
frame just enough to slide a 4x4 between the sills and the frame; seen from
above it was like this:
-----
| body|
) (
xxx| |xxx <--- 4x4
| |
xxx| |xxx
) (
| |
-----

Then I stacked 4 cinder blocks next to each end of each 4x4, and with three
friends lifted the body up and placed each 4x4 onto the cinder blocks. The
frame and attached suspension can then be simply rolled out from under the
body when you want to work on it, and rolled back under when your done.
Since I also subsequently removed all the suspension pieces, I commandeered
my son's Western Flyer wagon and set one end of the frame on it, so that I
can still roll the stripped frame out from under the body.
This also gives you easy access to the entire body shell.

Good luck! - Lee

Lee M. Daniels Laboratory for Molecular Structure and Bonding Texas A&M
(email redacted) (409) 845-3726 Fax (409) 845-9351
'74 TR6 '77 MGB


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Mail From: (email redacted) (DUHART JOHN)

Hey All,



Thanks to everyone who has responded to my post asking what you people
have done with bodyshell/parts of your cars while you are doing
restorations. I got lots very informative replies. The general
consensus seems to be:



a) Build a platform from wood that you can place the body shell onto.
The platform should be on casters so you can roll the bodyshell
into/outof the garage to work on the frame/drivetrain.



b) Hoist the Bodyshell up and leave it connected to the ceiling This
sounds good if you don't have a lot of work to do to the body, but not so
good if you do.



I was glad to hear the following:



a) The bonnet weighs ~50lbs, and is maneuverable by one

b) The body shell (minus doors, bonnet, side panels, trucklid) ~300 lbs.



I can squat 315lbs, so I should be able to handle this with the help of
a neighbor/Dad!



Thanks,

JHD IV





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Mail From: "Kurt Oblinger" <(email redacted)>

> Thanks to everyone who has responded to my post asking what you people
>have done with bodyshell/parts of your cars while you are doing
>restorations. I got lots very informative replies. The general
>consensus seems to be:

>a) Build a platform from wood that you can place the body shell onto.
>The platform should be on casters so you can roll the bodyshell
>into/outof the garage to work on the frame/drivetrain.

>b) Hoist the Bodyshell up and leave it connected to the ceiling This
>sounds good if you don't have a lot of work to do to the body, but not so
>good if you do.

I didn't get in on the first round of this but it made me think of a revised
method to the one I used. I built 2 wooden dollys for my TR3. One for the
body tub and one for the chassis, both on casters. Body panels are removed
displayed on the wall and in the rafters. However, if I have to do it again,
(and I will, several times) I think I can be a little more space efficient
by constructing th body dolly with the vertical risers spaced wider than the
frame and its dolly and the shelf of the body dolly higher than the frame
as it sits on its dolly so one could be "parked" under the other. This way
both components would take up only slightly more than one car space. To work
on either, you simply wheel one out of the way. I would probably weld up the
dollies out of square tube as well instead of wood. I also have an extra TR3
frame which I'm going to use as the basis of a rotisserie for the body.

Just my two cents. Good luck and be careful!

Kurt Oblinger
Redondo Beach, Ca

TR2 TR3 Vitesse TR7 Doretti Mini-Cooper S Norton Commando (wanting a bigger
garage)






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