TRExp

Spitfires List Archive

Rear Height

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

mailbot Avatar
mailbot Mail List Archive Bot
The Interwebs, USA   USA
This read-only message was archived from a public mail list.
Mail From: Matthew Milkevitch <(email redacted)>

Fellow Listers;
This afternoon, I attempted to adjust the rear brakes on my '77 Spit. When I
jacked up one side, I noticed that the wheel "tucked in" rather dramatically
(i.e., the bottom of the tire angled in toward the center of the
car...positive camber I believe). This was so dramatic that the half-shaft
actually touched the frame and the wheel wouldn't spin properly.
Is this normal...or is this the classic sign of a sagging rear spring?
I have worked on the rear suspension recently (over the winter), in which I
installed a used differential. While that was a long and involved repair,
nothing untoward happened with that.
Any advice/opinions would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Matt Milkevitch'77 SpitfireWillow Grove, PA
_______________________________________________

(email redacted)
Donate: team.net/donate.html
Suggested annual donation $11.47
Archive: team.net/archive
Forums: team.net/forums


. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
mailbot Avatar
mailbot Mail List Archive Bot
The Interwebs, USA   USA
This read-only message was archived from a public mail list.
Mail From: "Jim Muller" <(email redacted)>

On 2 Jul 2010 at 17:09, Matthew Milkevitch wrote:

> When I jacked up one side, I noticed that the wheel "tucked in"
> rather dramatically... Is this normal...or is this the classic
> sign of a sagging rear spring?

I hate to tell you this, Matthew, but that is completely normal. It
is doing exactly what it should do. You can worry if you want to but
it won't do any good. :-) Not that worrying ever does any good
anyway.

The Spitfire rear suspension uses swing axles. The axle moves up and
down through the suspension travel by pivoting at the u-joint at the
differential end. The axle is a solid shaft and the wheel is always
perpendicular to the axle, so as the axle drops down the wheel's
angle changes along with it.

The reason the axle hit the frame when you jacked up the car is
because there is nothing to prevent it from doing so. The spring is
meant to hold the car up, which actually means pushing the wheel and
the car body away from each other. In other words, it pushes the
spring down and the car up. When the tire sits on the ground the
wheel pushes upward on the spring, and spring pushes the car up off
the wheel. But when the car is lifted up by a jack the spring won't
hold the wheel up, and in fact the spring is still pushing it down so
it goes as far down as it can go.

As for the sagging rear, that happens when the spring doesn't push
the wheel and body apart hard enough. You wouldn't notice one way or
the other when you jack the car up.

--
Jim Muller
(email redacted)
'80 Spitfire, '70 GT6+
_______________________________________________

(email redacted)
Donate: team.net/donate.html
Suggested annual donation $11.47
Archive: team.net/archive
Forums: team.net/forums


mailbot Avatar
mailbot Mail List Archive Bot
The Interwebs, USA   USA
This read-only message was archived from a public mail list.
Mail From: Kevin Rhodes <(email redacted)>

At 08:09 PM 7/2/2010, you wrote:
>Fellow Listers;
>This afternoon, I attempted to adjust the rear brakes on my '77 Spit. When I
>jacked up one side, I noticed that the wheel "tucked in" rather dramatically
>(i.e., the bottom of the tire angled in toward the center of the
>car...positive camber I believe). This was so dramatic that the half-shaft
>actually touched the frame and the wheel wouldn't spin properly.
>Is this normal...or is this the classic sign of a sagging rear spring?
>I have worked on the rear suspension recently (over the winter), in which I
>installed a used differential. While that was a long and involved repair,
>nothing untoward happened with that.
>Any advice/opinions would be appreciated.
>Thanks,
>Matt Milkevitch'77 SpitfireWillow Grove, PA

Sounds pretty normal to me. It's a single-pivot swing axle, so that
is what happens when you jack it up. You will get a bit less
deflection when you jack up both sides at the same time, I think,
which is why you probably didn't notice it previously.

Kevin Rhodes
Westbrook, Maine
Freddy the Spitfire of many varied bits and model years, whose
chassis is also a '77 - bought 15 years ago next Thursday, one of us
is getting old!
_______________________________________________

(email redacted)
Donate: team.net/donate.html
Suggested annual donation $11.47
Archive: team.net/archive
Forums: team.net/forums


. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
mailbot Avatar
mailbot Mail List Archive Bot
The Interwebs, USA   USA
This read-only message was archived from a public mail list.
Mail From: Charles Reid <(email redacted)>

It is normal for the swing axles to drop when you lift the car, and the wheels
do normally 'tuck in' as you describe. I just replaced the rear spring in my
Spitfire and the swing axles don't drop all the way to the frame, so your
spring is sagging more than when it was new. Do you need to replace it? Not
necessarily. I replaced mine because I'm doing a complete restoration, but
also because the wheels displayed a slight negative camber when the car was
empty and a pronounced negative camber when I sat in the car.

I have yet to get to the point of setting up the suspension geometry, but this
seems to be a good site for describing the variables and settings.

auskellian.com/paul/links_files/performance_enhancements.htm

Check out the Rear Suspension part of the page.

Charles Reid
1980 Triumph Spitfire




> Date: Fri, 2 Jul 2010 17:09:38 -0700
> From: (email redacted)
> To: (email redacted)
> Subject: [Spits] Rear Height
>
> Fellow Listers;
> This afternoon, I attempted to adjust the rear brakes on my '77 Spit. When
I
> jacked up one side, I noticed that the wheel "tucked in" rather
dramatically
> (i.e., the bottom of the tire angled in toward the center of the
> car...positive camber I believe). This was so dramatic that the half-shaft
> actually touched the frame and the wheel wouldn't spin properly.
> Is this normal...or is this the classic sign of a sagging rear spring?
> I have worked on the rear suspension recently (over the winter), in which I
> installed a used differential. While that was a long and involved repair,
> nothing untoward happened with that.
> Any advice/opinions would be appreciated.
> Thanks,
> Matt Milkevitch'77 SpitfireWillow Grove, PA
> _______________________________________________
>
> (email redacted)
> Donate: team.net/donate.html
> Suggested annual donation $11.47
> Archive: team.net/archive
> Forums: team.net/forums
> Unsubscribe/Manage:
autox.team.net/mailman/options/spitfires/(email redacted)

_________________________________________________________________
The New Busy is not the too busy. Combine all your e-mail accounts with
Hotmail.
windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multiaccount&ocid=PID2832
6::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_4
_______________________________________________

(email redacted)
Donate: team.net/donate.html
Suggested annual donation $11.47
Archive: team.net/archive
Forums: team.net/forums


. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Sorry, you can't reply to this topic. It has been closed.


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster